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NHGRI Issues 10 RFAs to Fund Genome Sequencing Technology Development

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) - The National Human Genome Research Institute may fund approximately $24 million in fiscal year 2007 under requests for applications for 10 new and/or competing continuation grants for genome sequencing technologies.
 
There are five RFAs for near-term development of genome sequencing technologies, each with a different award mechanism, and five for genome sequencing technologies aimed at the $1,000 genome, also with several award mechanisms.
 
Both RFAs are modifications of RFAs announced in December 2005. The application deadlines are in late November 2007.
 
Near-Term Technology Development for Genome Sequencing
 
For the “Near-Term Technology Development for Genome Sequencing” RFAs, NHGRI expects to fund $12 million in awards, to be allocated as follows:
 
Under the R01 mechanism, NHGRI plans to make two to seven awards for a total of $4 million, subject to funding approval. Each project can apply for up to $1.5 million in direct costs per year. More information is available here.
 
Under the R21 mechanism, NHGRI may make five to nine awards for a total of $2 million. The direct costs are limited to $200,000 each year. More information is available here.
 
Under the R21/R33 mechanism, NHGRI will try to fund two to six awards for a total of $2 million. Direct costs are limited to no more than $200,000 per year for the R21 phase and no more than $1.5 million per year for the R33 phase. More information is available here.
 
Under the SBIR R43/R44 mechanism, NHGRI expects two to six awards for a total of $2 million. Each project will be restricted to $250,000 total costs per year and time periods up to 2 years may be requested for Phase I grants. For Phase II grants, the budgets are increased to $1.5 million total costs per year and time periods up to 3 years. More information is available here.
 
Under the STTR R41/R42 mechanism, NHGRI expects two to six awards for a total of $2 million. Each project will be restricted to $250,000 total costs per year and time periods up to 2 years may be requested for Phase I grants. For Phase II grants, the budgets are increased to $1.5 million total costs per year and time periods up to 3 years. More information is available here.
 
Revolutionary Genome Sequencing Technologies
 
For the “Revolutionary Genome Sequencing Technologies – The $1000 Genome” RFAs, NHGRI expects to fund $12 million in awards, subject to funding approvals, to be allocated as follows:
 
Under the R01 mechanism, NHGRI plans to make two to seven awards for a total of $4 million, subject to funding approval. Each project can apply for up to $1.5 million in direct costs per year. More information is available here.
 
Under the R21 mechanism, NHGRI may make five to nine awards for a total of $2 million. The direct costs are limited to $200,000 each year. More information is available here.
 
Under the R21/R33 mechanism, NHGRI will try to fund two to six awards for a total of $2 million. Direct costs are limited to no more than $200,000 per year for the R21 phase and no more than $1.5 million per year for the R33 phase. More information is available here.
 
Under the SBIR R43/R44 mechanism, NHGRI expects two to six awards for a total of $2 million. Each project will be restricted to $250,000 total costs per year and time periods up to 2 years may be requested for Phase I grants. For Phase II grants, the budgets are increased to $1.5 million total costs per year and time periods up to 3 years. More information is available here.
 
Under the STTR R41/R42 mechanism, NHGRI expects two to six awards for a total of $2 million. Each project will be restricted to $250,000 total costs per year and time periods up to 2 years may be requested for Phase I grants. For Phase II grants, the budgets are increased to $1.5 million total costs per year and time periods up to 3 years. More information is available here.

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