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NHGRI Awards $13M in GO Stimulus Grants in FY '09 for Sequencing Tech, Data Analysis Tools

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The National Human Genome Research Institute has made several "Grand Opportunity" awards with Recovery Act funding, totaling almost $13 million in fiscal year 2009, for projects that aim to develop or improve high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies, front-end methods, and sequencing data handling and analysis.

The awards, recently made available through the National Institutes of Health's grant database, are as follows:

• Ron Davis at Stanford University is receiving $1.98 million in fiscal 2009 to develop "a strategy for high-quality clinical resequencing of the human genome." According to the grant abstract, his team will be using Pacific Biosciences' single-molecule sequencing platform.

• John Thompson at Helicos BioSciences won $1.43 million in fiscal year 2009 for "providing the $1,000 genome via improved single-molecule sequencing."

• George Church at Harvard Medical School will receive $1.29 million in fiscal 2009 for the "development of electron microscopy-based nucleic acid polymer sequencing." Church is on the scientific advisory board of Halcyon Molecular, which is working on such an approach.

• Gabor Marth at Boston College will receive $1.09 million in fiscal year 2009 to develop "modular software for sequence data quality checking alignment and variant-calling"

• Lindsay Stuart at Arizona State University will receive $839,000 in fiscal year 2009 to study "carbon nanotubes, a new synthetic nanopore for sequencing."

• James Taylor at Emory University and colleagues are receiving $781,000 in fiscal year 2009 to work on a "dynamically scalable accessible analysis for next-generation sequence data."

• Xiaoliang Xie at Harvard University is receiving $736,000 in fiscal 2009 for "single cell single molecule digital mRNA profiling with no PCR amplification."

• Geoffrey Fox at Indiana University, Bloomington, has been awarded $735,000 in fiscal year 2009 for the "investigation of cloud computing to support data-parallel health research," which include, but are not limited to, DNA sequence analysis

• Annelise Barron at Stanford University will receive $733,000 in fiscal year 2009 to develop "a universal front end to improve assembly outcomes for next-gen sequencing and re[sequencing]."

• Florian Fricke from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, will receive $675,000 in fiscal year 2009 to develop "virtual machines and cloud computing for automated and portable sequence analysis."

• Toby Bloom at the Broad Institute is receiving $621,000 in fiscal 2009 for the "development of a software pipeline for sequence data."

• Steve Turner at Pacific Biosciences is receiving $595,000 in fiscal 2009 for "direct single base-pair real-time DNA methylation sequencing."

• Mark Akeson at the University of California, Santa Cruz, will receive $562,000 in fiscal year 2009 to develop technology for "controlling large DNA fragments during nanopore sequencing."

• Martin Eden from the University of Miami School of Medicine will receive $500,000 in fiscal year 2009 to develop "statistical methods for next-gen sequencing in disease association studies."

• Mark Yandell at the University of Utah and colleagues are receiving $400,000 in fiscal 2009 to develop a "tool for [the] annotation and analyses of human whole-genome sequence variation data."