Nanopore Sequencing Makes Strides in 2010 as Technology Improves, Investment Grows | GenomeWeb

By Monica Heger

The past year saw enormous progress in the field of nanopore sequencing with advances ranging from the design of protein nanopores to the use of graphene in the solid-state field, improvements in slowing down the rate of DNA translocation through the pore, and the ability to distinguish individual bases and epigenetic modifications in the pore.

Get the full story with
GenomeWeb Premium

Only $95 for the
first 90 days*

A trial upgrade to GenomeWeb Premium gives you full site access, interest-based email alerts, access to archives, and more. Never miss another important industry story.

Try GenomeWeb Premium now.

Already a GenomeWeb Premium member? Login Now.
Or, See if your institution qualifies for premium access.

*Before your trial expires, we’ll put together a custom quote with your long-term premium options.

Not ready for premium?

Browse our free articles
You can still register for access to our free content.

Replication studies that don't quite reflect the original findings underscore the need to better share data, the Wall Street Journal reports.

About two-thirds of proposals to work with select agents are denied — though most proposals that come in don't meet the definition of a restricted experiment, according to an analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers examine plant and human DNA found on the Shroud of Turin.

In PNAS this week: Plasmodium knowlesi population structure, 'pre-adaptations' in algal ancestors of land plants, and more.

Sponsored by
Personal Genome Diagnostics

This webinar will highlight the key considerations and applications of next-generation sequencing for managing non-small cell lung cancer patients using plasma-based approaches. 

Sponsored by

This webinar will discuss the benefits of a rapid targeted next-generation sequencing (TNGS) panel, using dried blood spots, for second-tier newborn metabolic and hearing loss screening and its immediate utility for high-risk diagnostic testing in the neonatal intensive care unit. 

Sponsored by
Oracle Health Sciences

Brian Wells of Penn Medicine will detail how his team's "PennOmics" integrated healthcare data warehouse accelerates clinical trial recruitment at the point of care, accepts data from wearables, and does it all in a secure, HIPAA- and research-compliant fashion.