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Macrogen Launches Axeq Tech Division for Sequencing Services

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Korean biotechnology firm Macrogen today announced the creation of its US-based division Axeq Technologies to provide next-generation sequencing services.

Based in Rockville, Md., Axeq also has offices in Amsterdam, Tokyo, and Seoul, South Korea. It offers a variety of DNA sequencing services, including exome, whole genome, targeted, pooled, RNA, transcriptome, and ChIP sequencing, it said in a statement.

According to its website, exome sequencing services start at $1,999 per sample.

Instrument and sample preparation platforms being used include those from Illumina, Life Technologies, Roche 454, Agilent Technologies, and Roche Nimblegen. The firm said it has developed a large sequencing capacity, with the ability, for example, to sequence more than 100,000 exome sequences each year.

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