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Janssen Diagnostics Inks Deal to Offer Asuragen SuraSeq Panels for Rare Cell Research

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Janssen Diagnostics is now offering next-generation sequencing cancer panels from Asuragen to its research customers, expanding its services in rare cell detection, the company said today.

Under an agreement with Asuragen, Janssen is offering its customers Asuragen's proprietary SuraSeq panels. Asuragen launched two SuraSeq panels last year, which cover hotspot mutations in up to 17 oncogenes.

Janssen said that the panels, when used in conjunction with its Cellsearch system for the detection of circulating tumor cells, will enable researchers to gain a more comprehensive understanding of tumor biology, drug response, and drug resistance.

"Our lab services team is focused on giving researchers tools to identify biomarkers that may be clinically relevant, and track their subjects' status over the course of their clinical trials – we call it 'dynamic monitoring'," said Kristen Hollingsworth, global business leader of Janssen Diagnostics, in a statement.

Janssen Diagnostics was established in 2012 as part of Janssen Pharmaceuticals and combines expertise from the former Virco, Veridex, and Companion Diagnostics Centre of Excellence. The company is based in Beerse, Belgium, and Raritan, NJ.

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