NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – A new study has found that individuals who immigrate to the US start to experience changes to their gut microbiomes soon after they arrive.

Individuals living in developing nations tend to have a more diverse assortment of bacteria within their gut microbiomes than do individuals in the US. Many immigrant and refugee populations in the US like the Hmong and Karen develop metabolic diseases like obesity, prompting concern among community members.

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Chinese state news agency Xinhua reports that a preliminary investigation has found He Jiankui performed his gene-editing work illegally.

John Mendelsohn, a former president of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, has died, the New York Times reports.

Identical twins receive different estimates of ancestry from the same direct-to-consumer genetic testing firms, CBC reports.

In PNAS this week: chromosomal features of maize, adaptations in the vinous-throated parrotbill, and more.

Jan
30
Sponsored by
Loop Genomics

This webinar will provide a comparison of several next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches — including short-read 16S, whole-genome sequencing (WGS), and synthetic long-read sequencing technology — for use in microbiome research studies.

Jan
31
Sponsored by
Roche

This webinar highlights the use of single-cell genomics to identify distinct cell types and states associated with enhanced immunity.

Feb
14
Sponsored by
Oxford Nanopore Technologies

This webinar will describe a project that applied Oxford Nanopore long-read RNA-seq to explore the transcriptional landscape of a damaging agricultural pest.

Feb
19
Sponsored by
Pillar Biosciences

This webinar will demonstrate how clinical laboratories can develop their own customized targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based solid tumor panels.