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Eureka Genomics Reels in $3.7M

By a GenomeWeb staff reporter

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Eureka Genomics has netted $3.7 million in financing through a private round that included individuals and undisclosed angel investors.

The Hercules, Calif.-based company said today that it plans to use the funding to advance its studies of novel microorganisms linked to specific cancers and other diseases, and to boost sales and marketing for its high-throughput sequencing data and bioinformatics service businesses.

"This funding will support the advancement of our lead programs in colorectal cancer, lymphoma, and cardiovascular disease," Eureka Genomics COO and Co-founder Didier Perez said in a statement. "Our advanced next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics capabilities have already resulted in the discovery of unique microbial associations with disease in animals and plants, and we are working to extend our discoveries to humans."

He added that the firm intends to add new partners over the coming year, which would include corporate collaborators for the co-development and commercialization of vaccines and diagnostics based on Eureka's discoveries.

Names of the investors in this round of funding were not disclosed.

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