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DNAPrint, Code Amber to Develop Memory Stick to Contain Children's DNA

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) — DNAPrint Genomics and Code Amber plan to co-develop and market a memory stick that can store a child’s DNA sequence, the companies said today.
 
DNAPrint also said it will become a sponsor on the Code Amber Ticker, a news feed that spreads alerts via the Web about missing or endangered children.  
 
The memory stick would hold DNA sequencing data on a flash memory device that also would contain photographs and other information about the child.
 
DNAPrint CEO and president Richard Gabriel said the Code Amber agreement is “one of many channels” the company uses to get parents to store their children’s DNA sequence information for identification and medical information.  

Financial terms of the agreement were not released.

Code Amber, based in Mandeville, La., “offers a range of products and services to law enforcement, media, corporations and the public dealing with Amber Alert notification, child safety and information storage.

Code Amber refers to the Amber Alert, a notification to the general public of a confirmed child abduction. The acronym AMBER stands for America's Missing: Broadcasting Emergency Response.” It is also the first name of Amber Hagerman, a 9-year-old who was abducted and murdered in Arlington, Texas, in 1996.

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