Broad Institute Develops Method for De Novo Assembly of Transcriptomes Without a Reference | GenomeWeb

By Monica Heger

This article was originally published Aug. 15.

Assembling transcriptomes without a reference can be tricky, but some researchers are now turning to de novo assembly from RNA-seq data to better understand the biology of organisms while avoiding the higher costs of whole-genome sequencing.

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