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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The government of Bangladesh this week inaugurated its first human whole-genome sequencing program.

Within this government-funded project, launched by the Bangladesh Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, researchers will identify genetic markers associated with cancer and inherited disease risks specific to the Bangladeshi population. Genomes will be sequenced using Illumina's NovaSeq-6000 platform in a recently minted BCSIR research lab, which has the capacity to sequence 48 genomes in three days.

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In Science this week: platform to diagnose genetic disease in children, lung disease-causing genetic mutation corrected in mice, and more.

Wired reports on how genetic genealogy's use in forensics has exploded in the year since an arrest in the Golden State Killer case was made.

Retraction Watch reports that the increase in retracted papers at a journal is due to more resources there to tackle publication ethics.

New York City has settled with a forensic scientist who was fired after questioning a DNA testing approach used by the medical examiner's office, the New York Times reports.

Apr
30
Sponsored by
Lexogen

This webinar will discuss novel long-read transcript sequencing (LRTseq) methods for transcriptome annotation that could increase the efficiency and accuracy of future sequencing projects.

May
01
Sponsored by
Illumina

This webinar will discuss the benefits of virus-specific target capture combined with next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify viral infections and conduct comprehensive genomic and transcriptomic interrogation.

May
07
Sponsored by
Agilent

This webinar will discuss the implementation of an enterprise-wide clinical genomics platform that is shared across 10 hospitals and research organizations in the Australian State of Victoria.

May
08
Sponsored by
Sysmex Inostics

This webinar will present recent evidence that demonstrates how incorporating circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) assessments into real-world patient management can influence patient care decisions, alter radiographic interpretations, and impact clinical outcomes.