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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – An international research team is reaching back in time — and into many ancient mouths — to watch human evolution in reverse, using ancient human and pathogen DNA to explore the possibility that selective pressure related to infectious diseases played a role in neuropsychiatric conditions and other brain diseases in European populations.

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US National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins says he will avoid male-only speaker panels.

Two patients fell ill, and one subsequently died, following a fecal microbiome transplant that harbored multi-drug-resistant bacteria, according to the New York Times.

Technology Review reports that eGenesis is testing whether organs from genetically modified pigs can be transplanted into monkeys.

In Science this week: almond reference genome, and more.

Jun
17
Sponsored by
Illumina

This webinar will provide an overview of polygenic risk scores, which aggregate dozens of genetic variants that have been linked to disease risk in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) into a single score.

Jun
18
Sponsored by
ArcherDX

This webinar will discuss background and clinical genomics of NTRK fusion detection in cancer. NTRK fusions are the focus of new therapeutic options, but clonal and subclonal lesions are notoriously difficult to detect. 

Jun
26
Sponsored by
Lexogen

This webinar will outline a study that combined genome-wide and classical molecular approaches to demonstrate that translation strongly affects mRNA stability in a codon-dependent manner, ultimately influencing mRNA and protein levels in higher organisms.