1000 Genomes Data on Admixed Population Serves as Sequence Source for Ancestral Indigenous Genomes | GenomeWeb

By Andrea Anderson

An international team
is working on methods to reconstruct genome sequences for an ancestral population using sequence data from admixed individuals assessed through the 1000 Genomes Project.

"By being involved with 1000 Genomes, we get the benefit of the deluge of data they're generating," Jake Byrnes, who began working on the project as a post-doctoral researcher in Carlos Bustamante's Stanford University laboratory, told In Sequence.

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