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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – SeraCare Life Sciences today announced a licensing agreement with the University of California, San Francisco for the use of its trisomy 21, 18, and 13 trophoblast cell line materials to develop reference materials for non-invasive prenatal testing of chromosomal abnormalities. 

In conjunction with the deal, SeraCare has launched an early access program for circulating, cell-free fetal DNA T21, T18, and T13 aneuploidy reference materials developed with the UCSF technology. 

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