NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Individuals who've managed to evade major disease into old age are more likely to carry genetic variants that may protect them against conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, heart disease, or cognitive decline, a new study suggests.

As part of the Wellderly study — an ongoing search for genetic factors contributing to a healthy lifespan — researchers from the Scripps Research Institute and elsewhere sequenced the genomes of 600 individuals who'd remained chronic disease- and serious medication-free until their 80th birthdays and beyond.

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Robert Redfield is floated as the next director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Washington Post reports.

The New York Times writes that the National Institutes of Health's All of Us Research Program is "ambitious" and that some are concerned it might be overly so.

Representative Lamar Smith's criticism of the National Science Foundation has "changed the nature of the conversation," according to ScienceInsider.

In PLOS this week: non-coding RNA function in yeast, transcriptomic profiles of malaria parasites, and more.

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This webinar will discuss how acoustic liquid handling can reduce the time and costs for labs performing carrier screening with next-generation sequencing.

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Liquid biopsies are becoming increasingly important for the detection of actionable mutations in cancer due to tumor heterogeneity as well as the practical limitations of invasive tissue biopsies.