NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – The Collaborative African Genomics Network (CAfGEN), an initiative tasked with using genomics technologies to probe host factors important to the progression of HIV and HIV-tuberculosis infection in sub-Saharan African children, is entering its third and final year of research under a $3 million National Institutes of Health grant.  

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The New York Times reports that as China invests in science, it also is dealing with research fraud.

In PLOS this week: transcriptome study of a cold-tolerant plant, deep sequencing of clinical influenza A samples, and more.

The Atlantic writes that retrotransposons like BovB have proliferated in a number of genomes.

Researchers have sequenced the genome of a man who lived in China some 40,000 years ago, according to UPI.

Oct
24
Sponsored by
OmniSeq

This webinar will discuss the advantages of a multiple-biomarker-based approach for immune profiling that provides clinicians with a rational means to consider approved immunotherapies or assign patients to immunotherapy clinical trials.

Nov
02
Sponsored by
Qiagen

This webinar will discuss the benefits of using unique molecular indices to overcome some challenges associated with next-generation sequencing panels.

Nov
09
Sponsored by
NuGEN

This webinar will discuss the role of a newly discovered, brain-enriched form of non-CpG DNA methylation in neural development and disease.

Dec
05
Sponsored by
Agilent Technologies

This webinar will discuss a molecular barcode-based error correction method that enables combined mutation detection and DNA copy number profiling through circulating tumor DNA sequencing.