YIPs

The University of Toronto's Mikko Taipale is working on developing new technologies to pave the way for gaining new biological insights.

Technion's Reut Shalgi is building up her lab to study how chaperones affect protein synthesis and protein folding.

EMBL-EBI's Oliver Stegle is taking a statistical approach to understanding genotype-phenotype associations.

Harvard Medical School's Kaitlin Samocha is studying de novo mutations linked to complex diseases like autism and schizophrenia.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Sangtae Kim is taking on the challenges of analyzing top-down proteomic data.

 At Brigham and Women's Hospital, Kimberly Glass is integrating different types of omics data to develop useful gene models.

Duke University's Slavé Petrovski is working to elucidate which genetic variations are likely benign versus ones that may be linked to disease.

By modeling organisms with systems biology data, Mount Sinai School of Medicine's Jonathan Karr plans to eventually engineer bacteria.

The Genome Institute of Singapore's Yue Wan is interested in why RNA folds as it does.

Sick Kids' Mohammed Uddin is analyzing various types of gene expression and mutational data to better understand autism.

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Researchers test gene therapy targeting a different cancer protein in a new trial, the New York Times reports.

Pennsylvania State University researchers found that salivary microRNAs could predict which kids would have longer concussion symptoms, according to NPR.

The Associated Press reports Alex Azar, the new Department of Health and Human Services secretary nominee, made millions of dollars as a pharmaceutical executive.

In PNAS this week: immune profiling of breast cancer, transposable element patterns in rice, and more.