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warfarin genotyping

Research presented at the American College of Cardiology scientific session in Atlanta today suggests individuals who receive genetic testing early in their warfarin treatment are up to 31 percent less likely to be hospitalized than those who don't.

An AHRQ official provided updates on the agency's ongoing activities in the personalized medicine field, including the development of a BRCA testing decision-support tool; a draft report on frameworks for gauging genetic testing quality; and a randomized-controlled trial on pharmacogenomics warfarin dosing that is unlikely to change the standard of care.

Looking at approximately 326,000 SNPs in 1,053 Swedish subjects, the study is thought to be the first "sufficiently powered" trial to detect genome-wide significance of three SNPs. As a result, study authors note that "additional genes having a major influence on warfarin dose might not exist or be found in the near-term."

A paper appearing in today's issue of NEJM demonstrates that combining genetic and clinical data can improve stable warfarin dose predictions — especially for those taking high or low doses of the drug. Now, large clinical trials in the US and Europe are slated to test the effect such dosing improvements have on clinical outcomes.

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Bloomberg reports that the DNA-for-cash deal reported in Kentucky might be a more widespread scam.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have treated infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using gene therapy in an early phase study.

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

In Nature this week: a genomic analysis of the snailfish Pseudoliparis swirei, ancient DNA analysis gives insight into the introduction of farming to England, and more.