super-responders

Dana-Farber and the Broad are using social media to identify extraordinary responders and other outlier patients to study what makes them genetically unique.

The Asian cancer biotech firm will use ACT's genomic tools to research why some patients responded unusually well to its pan-HER inhibitor.

Absent mature data suggesting that Genentech's biomarker strategy would likely prove Avastin's efficacy in a subpopulation, ODAC members did not want to expose patients unnecessarily to a toxic agent for many years to come.

If Genentech produces data showing substantial benefit in a subset of patients, "a new science-based indication could be approved," an FDA official said. "Until that time, it is not appropriate for the drug to continue to be approved for the treatment of breast cancer when the totality of the available data does not support such an approval."

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.