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Precision Medicine Initiative

Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, aerial view

The institute has also been awarded additional funding from the National Institutes of Health for its increased participation in the initiative.

Proponents believe the Million European Genomes Alliance will spur research, stimulate the life sciences economy, and ultimately improve clinical care.

The NIH found widespread support for the program, as well as willingness to participate, that was consistent across demographic groups.

The NIH is seeking new regional medical centers to help enroll and manage a portion of the up to 1 million volunteers expected to participate in the initiative.

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology's ability to test new standards and policies is hindered without $5 million Obama requested for FY2016.

Seeking a Cohort

Researchers in the US begin to seek participants for the 1 million-person precision medicine cohort, the New York Times reports.

Down the Road a Ways

Precision medicine is still years away, if it's achievable at all, according to Technology Review.

The company is targeting the new product at researchers who need a comprehensive, pan-ethnic, and affordable solution to genotype many samples.

'Customized Care'

In an op-ed, President Barack Obama says the US is investing in precision medicine.

NIH Director Francis Collins; FDA Commissioner Robert Califf

With NIH funds, organizations will build the 1 million volunteer cohort, while FDA's draft guidances will inform regulation of genetic tests critical for precision medicine.

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A new study finds that three dimensional facial scans may be able to aid in diagnosing rare genetic diseases.

The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine have retracted two COVID-19 papers due to concerns about the data used in their analyses.

Lawmakers plan to introduce a bill that aims to prevent the theft of US-funded research, according to the Wall Street Journal.

In Science this week: analysis of ancient Caribbean islanders' genomes suggests at least three waves of migration into the region,  DNA barcoding of microbial spores, and more.