PGP

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – The New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute and PersonalGenomes.org on Monday announced they are partnering to identify genetic and environmental factors in trait and disease development.

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb News) – Members of the Personal Genome Project and their collaborators have developed a community resource aimed at improving the analysis and interpretation of human genomes.

Organizers of the Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation project are attempting to drum up interest in developing new methods to predict human phenotypes from genomic information.

For early adopters, there are many reasons to be excited about the potential of whole-genome sequencing to broadly personalize healthcare. But for some public health observers, the analytical and educational challenges present an overwhelming hurdle.

Since a US federal district court last month deemed seven of Myriad Genetics' BRCA patents invalid, certain industry players have taken small steps toward fostering more collaboration around gene patents while others have raised questions about the value of patenting genes altogether amid rapid advances in whole-genome sequencing.

At the Genomes, Environment, Traits conference, George Church discussed progress being made on the Personal Genomes Project as well as future directions for the effort.

In a newsletter published last week, PGP organizers said they have now started to enroll participants for the PGP-100. Enrollment for the next phase of the project, PGP-1000, is expected to start later this year.

Whether the project will adopt whole-genome sequencing instead of exome sequencing will depend on factors such as its ability to raise funding and "the willingness of sequencing companies to publicly showcase their technologies through sponsorship of PGP-100 genomes."

Complete Genomics is in discussions with some of its pilot customers regarding large-scale projects on the order of hundreds of genomes, company officials said.

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Rare gene mutations are guiding the search for drugs to manage chronic pain without opioids, according to CNBC.

The new Francis Crick Institute building can get too noisy for some researchers to concentrate, according to the Guardian.

CBS News reports that there are still many vacancies at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, but that it's uncertain whether they will be filled.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: pipeline to analyze and visualize bacterial genomes, database of global set of human genomes, and more.