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human migration

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: sequenced genomes of five additional Neanderthals, and more.

The researchers estimated that the newly sequenced late Neanderthals likely split from the lineage leading to much older Altai Neanderthal roughly 150,000 years ago.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: analysis of DNA from ancient North Africans, and more.

By sequencing a handful of individuals who lived in Morocco some 13,900 to 15,100 years ago, investigators found clues to past population mergers in North Africa.

New ancient DNA studies have revealed female-biased migrations into Bavaria during the Middle Ages and more ancient Neolithic farmer expansions into Iberia.

Sequence data for ancient and modern individuals in Remote Oceania and beyond suggests early populations were replaced without corresponding language changes.

Using genomic data for hundreds of ancient Europeans, research teams retraced the spread of the Beaker complex culture as well as interactions between pastoralists and hunter-gatherers.

By sequencing seven new Mesolithic individuals, researchers retraced two hunter-gatherer migrations into Scandinavia after the Last Glacial Maximum.

A mitochondrial genome- and Y chromosome marker-based analysis suggests the Chachapoyas population was not completely replaced by Incas as previously believed.

Using Neolithic and Chalcolithic period samples, researchers explored farming and hunter-gatherer admixture in populations from Hungary, Spain, and Germany.

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The American Prospect writes that the pilot program to test the DNA of migrants could lead to more family separations.

An international commission is to develop a report on how researchers, clinicians, and regulators should evaluate the clinical applications of human germline genome editing.

The US Department of Agriculture presents a new blueprint for animal genomic research.

In Genome Research this week: repetitive element deletion linked to altered methylation and more in form of muscular dystrophy; human contamination in draft bacterial and archaeal genomes; and more.