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human migration

Using genome sequences for 161 present-day Papuans and Island Southeast Asians, researchers described three Denisovan lineages and estimated divergence times between them.

With ancient mitochondrial sequences from all seven Canary Islands, researchers identified at least two early migrations involving shifting populations from North Africa.

The researchers found evidence of genetic continuity in Anatolia, even as the subsistence strategy changed from hunting and gathering to farming.

In Science this week: analysis of ancient DNA recovered from Iberian populations, and more.

Two ancient DNA studies published today examined admixture and genetic changes among Iberian populations, starting from the Paleolithic Era.

A University of Pennsylvania-led team found that genetic population structure in Africa is associated with geography, as well as with language and lifestyle.

Researchers sequenced 45 individuals from the Caucasus and steppe region between 3,500 and 6,500 years ago, teasing out distinct populations and shared relationships.

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In the Past

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

Researchers also found that Neanderthals differed from humans more in the regulatory than protein-coding sequences of their genomes.

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23andMe is offering early customers re-testing on newer chips for a fee, Wired reports.

He Jiankui is no longer affiliated with Direct Genomics Biotechnology, the single molecule sequencing company he founded, Nikkei Asian Review reports.

Newsweek writes about the hopes for precision medicine in cancer, but also challenges getting it to patients.

In Genome Research this week: genomic architecture of glioblastoma, predictive computational approach to estimate SNP fitness, and more.