Close Menu

human migration

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: analyses of ancient genomes from Siberia and North American individuals gives insight into migration patterns, and more.

Two research groups analyzed ancient DNA samples from across the Arctic to tease out how populations in Siberia and North America are related to one another.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: metabolic gene duplication enables freshwater adaptation, genetic analysis of wheat, and more.

The researchers' model indicates that numerous admixture events took place as pastoralism arose in sub-Saharan Africa.

The researchers traced the timing of when these clusters developed to the emergence of agriculture in three river valleys.

The Japan Times reports that researchers sequenced the genome of a woman who lived during the Jomon period.

In Genome Biology this week: archaic gene flow into sub-Saharan African populations, a de novo transcriptome assembler, and more.

Based on allele fragment sizes and mutational signatures, Europeans may have had shorter generation times than other populations, a Biology of Genomes speaker said.

Genetic material found in tooth samples from the Bronze Age, Iron Age, and Medieval period points to migrations from Siberia at the Bronze Age-Iron Age transition.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: sequencing of Globular Amphora culture individuals, characterization of effects of variants of unknown significance in EGFR, and more.

Pages

New US Department of Commerce rules will affect supercomputing in China, according to the Wall Street Journal.

A new analysis finds that it will be more than a century until female computer scientists publish at the same rate as their male counterparts, ScienceInsider reports.

Broad Institute researchers describe an approach they've dubbed "DNA microscopy."

In PLOS this week: epigenetic changes following hepatitis C virus treatment, metagenomic analysis of Ugandan children with febrile illness, and more.