human migration

With genetic data for seven Stone and Iron Age individuals, researchers estimate that human populations in southern Africa started diverging more than 260,000 years ago.

Data from hundreds of individuals suggest that the country's populations are genetically diverse, with a long history of genetic isolation and differentiation.

By genotyping hundreds of individuals from populations in Sudan and South Sudan, investigators untangled genetic contributions from Eurasian groups migrating into Africa.

Phylogenetic patterns for more than 2,200 dengue viruses collected in Asia over almost 60 years suggest air travel hubs have contributed to the virus' spread in the region.

Investigators sequenced 3,700-year-old Canaanite genomes and compared them to present-day populations to explore the historical people's origin and fate.

Researchers saw an over-representation of rarer variants in isolated groups when they sequenced thousands of individuals from 10 European populations.

Sarcophagus of Tadja, Abusir el-Meleq

The team uncovered ties to Near Eastern and Levant populations with mitochondrial genome sequences and genome-wide SNP profiles for up to 90 Egyptian mummies.

Using data for thousands of African individuals, researchers retraced migrations by Bantu language groups and ties to other populations in Africa and beyond.

An analysis of Aboriginal Australian samples stretching back to the 1920s suggests these populations may have been on the continent for up to 50,000 years.

The transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural lifestyles seems to have spread to the Baltics without massive migration from Anatolia or the Levant.

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The New York Times reports that as China invests in science, it also is dealing with research fraud.

In PLOS this week: transcriptome study of a cold-tolerant plant, deep sequencing of clinical influenza A samples, and more.

The Atlantic writes that retrotransposons like BovB have proliferated in a number of genomes.

Researchers have sequenced the genome of a man who lived in China some 40,000 years ago, according to UPI.