human migration

This Week in Science

In Science this week: ancient genomes inform studies of human migration in the Americas, and more.

Separate research groups have examined the genomes of modern and ancient Mongolian populations to study their ancestry, finding a relationship to Native Americans.

The genomic analysis also found that drug resistance mutations have appeared locally, suggesting that the issue can still be addressed region by region.

With NIPT samples from more than 141,000 women in China, investigators retraced population structure, historical migrations, genetic associations, and more.

A University of Chicago-led team examined the genomes of more than 3,500 Sardinians and found within-island genetic substructure and outside admixture.

Individuals with northern genetic ancestry were buried with more grave goods than individuals with local southern genetic ancestry, the researchers found.

Alemannic burial site.

At a 7th century German burial site, researchers saw genetic markers from populations in northern Europe, southern Europe, and the Mediterranean.

Diet- and height-related variants were selected for in a Flores Island pygmy population, according to a study, which also provided insights into the population's history.

Using bulk DNA samples produced from more than 5,000 subfossil bone fragments, researchers retraced species trajectories and extinctions over time in New Zealand.

With genome sequences or genotyping profiles for 280 Native American and mestizo individuals, researchers explored population history and dynamics in Peru.

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A new study finds that a placental protein linked with preeclampsia can be targeted by RNA silencing, according to the New Scientist.

A settlement is expected in a Duke University lawsuit hinging on using falsified data to win grants, Retraction Watch and Science report.

In PNAS this week: approach for analyzing the expression of endogenous retroviruses, circular RNAs that influence host-virus interactions, and more.

A phylogenetic analysis finds that the rare hemimastigotes form their own supra-kingdom, CBC reports.