human migration

By sequencing seven new Mesolithic individuals, researchers retraced two hunter-gatherer migrations into Scandinavia after the Last Glacial Maximum.

A mitochondrial genome- and Y chromosome marker-based analysis suggests the Chachapoyas population was not completely replaced by Incas as previously believed.

Using Neolithic and Chalcolithic period samples, researchers explored farming and hunter-gatherer admixture in populations from Hungary, Spain, and Germany.

With genetic data for seven Stone and Iron Age individuals, researchers estimate that human populations in southern Africa started diverging more than 260,000 years ago.

Data from hundreds of individuals suggest that the country's populations are genetically diverse, with a long history of genetic isolation and differentiation.

By genotyping hundreds of individuals from populations in Sudan and South Sudan, investigators untangled genetic contributions from Eurasian groups migrating into Africa.

Phylogenetic patterns for more than 2,200 dengue viruses collected in Asia over almost 60 years suggest air travel hubs have contributed to the virus' spread in the region.

Investigators sequenced 3,700-year-old Canaanite genomes and compared them to present-day populations to explore the historical people's origin and fate.

Researchers saw an over-representation of rarer variants in isolated groups when they sequenced thousands of individuals from 10 European populations.

Sarcophagus of Tadja, Abusir el-Meleq

The team uncovered ties to Near Eastern and Levant populations with mitochondrial genome sequences and genome-wide SNP profiles for up to 90 Egyptian mummies.

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A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.