Human Genome Project

John Sulston Dies

Nobel-winner John Sulston, who also led the British effort to sequence the human genome, has died, BBC News reports.

The Human Genome Project was launched 25 years ago, and at Nature, Francis Collins, James Watson, and Eric Green look back at the lessons learned.

Promises, Promises

David Dobbs writes at Buzzfeed that genomics has delivered little on its promises.

GenomeWeb takes an in-depth look at efforts to make genetic variation an integral part of the canonical human reference assembly.

The $3.8 billion investment in the Human Genome Project was foundational for $796 billion in output, and a trove of new technologies, according to an industry-commissioned report from Battelle.

Since a US federal district court last month deemed seven of Myriad Genetics' BRCA patents invalid, certain industry players have taken small steps toward fostering more collaboration around gene patents while others have raised questions about the value of patenting genes altogether amid rapid advances in whole-genome sequencing.

In a quartet of opinion articles in Nature online today, researchers discuss the legacy of the initial human genome sequencing projects and the future of genomics research.

In a statement, National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins says sexual harassment is "morally indefensible" and "unacceptable."

Octopuses might owe their intelligence to their liberal alterations to their genes, Cosmos reports.

Stat News and ProPublica report that African Americans are underrepresented in cancer clinical trials.

In Cell this week: genomic analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysm, effect of probiotics on the microbiome, and more.