HLA

This Week in Science

In Science this week: a protective gene in C. elegans, and combining EHRs with genetic data to ID HLA-associated variants

The approach allowed the researchers to identify almost 300 HLA mutations overall, many of which they were able to validate using other methods.

Scientists at the Anthony Nolan Research Institute, in collaboration with Pacific Biosciences, recently published a study on typing HLA class I genes.

The firm's LinkSeq test is now available in Europe for IVD applications for solid organ and stem cell transplantation. 

The results provide early evidence for the ability of haplotypes in the HLA-DRB1 gene to predict outcome and drug response, which will have to be further replicated.

MinIon

The researchers concluded that the technology "holds promise for clinical applications."

Biofortuna will design, develop, and manufacture a range of freeze-dried HLA-typing kits with the brand name SSPGo for Abbott's molecular diagnostics business.

The UK-based company said that its new product is the first-ever complete freeze-dried PCR kit, and can be transported and stored at ambient temperatures and used by relatively unskilled technicians, making it suitable for applications on a "global scale."

Using DNA to sketch crime victims might not be a great idea, the NYTimes says.

Science has its own problem with sexual harassment. What do we do with the research these abusers produce, Wired asks.

Senate Republicans led by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) are trying to change how the government funds basic research, reports ScienceInsider.

In Science this week: combining genomics and ecology to better understand the effects of natural selection on evolution, and more.