GWAS

Using data for more than 140,000 individuals, researchers narrowed in on 63 new prostate cancer-associated loci and established a polygenic score linked to enhanced risk.

Using genotype and blood plasma protein information for thousands of healthy individuals, researchers documented variants influencing plasma protein levels.

The New York Genome Center spinout has focused on developing imputation algorithms to enable low-coverage whole-genome sequencing for as low as $50 per sample.

Using genotyping profiles for nearly 256,000 individuals, researchers uncovered more than 100 new loci involved in nearsightedness.

At least half a dozen cancer phenotypes showed significant associations with GWAS variant-based polygenic risk scores in a new phenome-wide association study.

Genome-wide association study hits can uncover potential therapies for conditions like inflammatory bowel disease, a Biology of Genomes speaker said.

MIT and Stanford computer scientists developed a technique for secure, massively scalable genomic analysis that they hope will unleash greater data sharing.

Conducting studies on Latina and African-American women produces population-specific insights on the genetics of the disease that aren't possible to glean in European-heavy GWAS.

Using large-scale GWAS data, researchers saw shared genetic contributors for ALS and frontotemporal dementia, as well as ALS and progressive supranuclear palsy.

Diverse Data Needed

Gizmodo writes that if personalized medicine is to benefit all, studies need to include diverse populations.

Pages

Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.