Close Menu

genetic genealogy

New Scientist reports that FamilyTreeDNA is offering customers a new way to opt out of allowing the FBI to access their data.

The revelation that Family Tree DNA has been working with law enforcement has some worried about a negative impact on the industry.

Access Agreement

Family Tree DNA is providing the FBI access to its genealogy database to investigate violent crimes, according to BuzzFeed News.

Maryland lawmakers consider bill to prevent law enforcement from using publicly available DNA databases to identify suspects, the Daily Record reports.

Unexpected Kits

In a bid to amass hard-to-trace gift cards from a refer-a-friend program, hackers ordered 2,400 DNA ancestry testing kits for strangers, according to USA Today.

With ever more data in hand, providers are seeking to enhance their services, providing more detailed ancestry estimates while introducing new offerings around genetic traits and health.

With genealogical data for 3.4 million individuals from Quebec, investigators traced a rare heart and digestive disease back to two 17th century founder families.

Shaken Identity

Genetic ancestry testing can affect a person's sense of identity, the New York Times Magazine writes.

The two papers published today in Science and Cell have implications for both forensics and genetic research.

We'll Try the Radio

Spotify and Ancestry.com are collaborating to devise playlists based on customers' ancestry testing results, Quartz reports.

Pages

New analyses indicate the P.1 variant found in Brazil may be able to infect people who have already had COVID-19, the New York Times reports.

According to CNBC, Novavax's CEO says its vaccine could be authorized in the US as early as May.

The US National Institutes of Health has a new initiative to address structural racism in biomedical research.

In PNAS this week: GWAS of TLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, analysis of twins with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and more.