Close Menu

genetic genealogy

No Access

Buzzfeed News reports that Family Tree DNA declined to give Parabon Nanolabs access to its database.

University of California, Davis researchers describe ways that genetic genealogy databases could be "hacked."

As 2020 dawns, forensic genomics is poised for growth as companies aim to harness the power of consumer databases coupled with advances in sequencing.

Forensic genetic firm Verogen has bought the genetic genealogy site GEDmatch.

Verogen will gain access to GEDmatch's database of genetic profiles, although users can choose whether law enforcement can search their data to solve violent crimes.

Two researchers have uncovered ways that users of genetic genealogy sites could be susceptible to "genetic hacking."

Harder to Find

Law enforcement officials say that changes to genetic genealogy databases have limited their ability to track down some suspects, NBC News reports.

A recent conference discussed genetic genealogy in light of new US Department of Justice guidelines, the New York Times reports.

The Justice Department has issued an interim policy governing the use of genetic genealogy, according to CNET.

And Maybe a Fee

The owner of the GEDmatch website tells CBS12 he is considering charging law enforcement a fee to use the site.

Pages

Politico reports that the NYPD DNA database has grown since it announced it would be removing profiles from it.

Forbes reports that a structural biology lab at Oxford University studying the coronavirus was hacked.

Science reports that a Dutch research funding agency is combating a ransomware attack.

In Science this week: set of 64 haplotype assemblies from 32 individuals, and more.