genetic genealogy

Bloomberg looks into privacy issues raised by law enforcement's use of genetic genealogy sites.

After the arrest of the Golden State Killer, ethicists say the government must delineate acceptable limits for future uses of public DNA databases.

NPR conducted a poll that asked people in the US about genetic testing to find that about a third have considered it.

Parabon NanoLabs is partnering with law enforcement to use genetic genealogy approaches to solve cold cases, Buzzfeed News reports.

Down to One Person

Science speaks with Columbia University's Yaniv Erlich about using genetic genealogical data to identify people.

Researchers constructed family trees with up to 13 million members from public genealogy profiles, but some disagree with their conclusions on the genetics of longevity.

American customers' interest in their genetic ancestry continues to be the primary driver of the consumer genomics market and shows no signs of diminishing. 

Living DNA and its partners are aiming to create a detailed genetic map of the world based on people's DNA.

With the rollout of Insitome's first app, consumers have the chance to explore their heritage in a new context that could reshape the ancestry testing market.

The company has developed a suite of initial products focused on ancestry that will compete with offerings from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA.

Pages

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions is considering using DNA tests to determine relatedness between adult and child migrants, the Daily Caller reports.

Bloomberg reports that Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics plans to offer a treatment it is developing under the "right to try" law for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

In Nature this week: expansion of disease-resistance genes among long-lived oak trees, and more.

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers report being able to determine age from dried bloodstains, Discover's D-brief blog reports.