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genetic genealogy

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

Buzzfeed News' Peter Aldhous tried his hand at genetic genealogy to identify some of his coworkers.

The Suspects, Too

At Slate, the R Street Institute's Nila Bala discusses the privacy rights of suspects that genetic genealogy approaches in law enforcement bring up.

"Wild West"

Mother Jones reports there are few regulations overseeing the use of genetic genealogy by law enforcement.

A genetic genealogy approach has led to the arrest of a mother in the 1981 death of her newborn, the New York Times reports.

New Scientist reports that FamilyTreeDNA is offering customers a new way to opt out of allowing the FBI to access their data.

The revelation that Family Tree DNA has been working with law enforcement has some worried about a negative impact on the industry.

Access Agreement

Family Tree DNA is providing the FBI access to its genealogy database to investigate violent crimes, according to BuzzFeed News.

Maryland lawmakers consider bill to prevent law enforcement from using publicly available DNA databases to identify suspects, the Daily Record reports.

Unexpected Kits

In a bid to amass hard-to-trace gift cards from a refer-a-friend program, hackers ordered 2,400 DNA ancestry testing kits for strangers, according to USA Today.

Pages

Bloomberg reports that the DNA-for-cash deal reported in Kentucky might be a more widespread scam.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have treated infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using gene therapy in an early phase study.

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

In Nature this week: a genomic analysis of the snailfish Pseudoliparis swirei, ancient DNA analysis gives insight into the introduction of farming to England, and more.