genetic genealogy

Researchers constructed family trees with up to 13 million members from public genealogy profiles, but some disagree with their conclusions on the genetics of longevity.

American customers' interest in their genetic ancestry continues to be the primary driver of the consumer genomics market and shows no signs of diminishing. 

Living DNA and its partners are aiming to create a detailed genetic map of the world based on people's DNA.

With the rollout of Insitome's first app, consumers have the chance to explore their heritage in a new context that could reshape the ancestry testing market.

The company has developed a suite of initial products focused on ancestry that will compete with offerings from 23andMe, AncestryDNA, and Family Tree DNA.

No Secret Identity

At the Guardian, Samantha Gillison writes that she took a DNA ancestry test and found she was exactly what she thought she was.

A recent study examining the websites of 30 DTC genomics firms found that many do not follow international recommendations for disclosing information to customers.

The company said the investments will support growth in its AncestryDNA genetic genealogy offering.

Consumer genetics companies field law enforcement requests, the Associated Press reports.

Genetic Roots

At the New York Times, Marie Tae McDermott writes about her experience with genetic testing as an adoptee.


Berkeley researchers have engineered yeast to make the molecule behind the hoppy taste of beer, Quartz reports.

King's College London researchers examine the influence of school type and genetics on academic achievement.

FiveThirtyEight writes that most who take a direct-to-consumer BRCA1/2 genetic test won't learn much from it.

In Science this week: early life experience influence somatic variation in the genome, and more.