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genetic genealogy

Two researchers have uncovered ways that users of genetic genealogy sites could be susceptible to "genetic hacking."

Harder to Find

Law enforcement officials say that changes to genetic genealogy databases have limited their ability to track down some suspects, NBC News reports.

A recent conference discussed genetic genealogy in light of new US Department of Justice guidelines, the New York Times reports.

The Justice Department has issued an interim policy governing the use of genetic genealogy, according to CNET.

And Maybe a Fee

The owner of the GEDmatch website tells CBS12 he is considering charging law enforcement a fee to use the site.

As part of the shift, DNA.Land, which was run as an academic research project, will delete all data by the end of the month and ask customers to resubmit it.

Search Decisions

The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

Two Utah cases represent the promise and pitfalls of using genetic genealogy in law enforcement, the Salt Lake Tribune reports.

And Overturned

Genetic genealogy has helped exonerate a man who has been jailed for 20 years, Agence France Presse reports.

Researchers examine how white nationalists handle personal genetic ancestry results that conflict with their racist worldview, the New York Times reports.

Pages

GenomeWeb reports that Veritas Genetics is suspending its US operations.

A Brazilian-led team of researchers reports it has generated a sugarcane genome assembly that encompasses more than 99 percent of its genome.

Certain plasma proteins could be used to gauge a person's age and whether they are aging well, according to HealthDay News.

In Science this week: approach to measure microRNA targeting efficiency, strategy to conduct high-throughput chemical screens at single-cell resolution, and more.