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evolutionary biology

In PNAS this week: statistical method for gene regulation evaluation, sea urchin gene regulatory networks, and more.

A new study suggests that teaching secondary school students genetics before evolution bolsters their understanding of evolution.

Where in the Family?

Sequencing could help resolve Homo naledi's spot on the hominid family tree, but Jennifer Raff writes at the Guardian that its DNA has been hard to find.

New bills have been introduced across the US that aim to alter science education standards, according to Nature News.

For Darwin

A US lawmaker introduces largely symbolic legislation to honor Charles Darwin, the Associated Press reports.

Bacteria living inside human, chimp, gorilla, and monkey lice appear to have evolved alongside the parasitic pests.

In PNAS this week: genetic hints of adaptive evolution in Atlantic herring, ancestry of ancient individuals from the Pacific Northwest, and more.

Cephalopods with complex hunting, behavioral, and social behavior seem to adjust post-transcriptional processes to adapt to changing environments.

Two manuscript pages handwritten by Charles Darwin are going on the auction block, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Researchers sequenced and analyzed 169 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from people with and without HIV infections.

Pages

The Washington Post reports that a Russian Academy of Sciences commission has led to the retraction of hundreds of scientific papers.

The Los Angeles Times' Daily Pilot reports the chief executive of Vantari Genetics has pleaded guilty in a kickback scheme.

News 4 Jax reports that a Florida bill to prevent life and long-term care insurers from using genetic information in their coverage decisions has easily passed one committee.

In Science this week: potentially pathogenic mutations found in hematopoietic stem cells from young healthy donors, and more.