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evolutionary biology

Packs a Punch

The genome of the carnivorous bladderwort is smaller than many other plant genomes, but it still holds on to important genes.

In Science this week: gene linked to expansion of the human neocortex, and more.

Two research groups concluded that a one-pulse model for Neanderthal-human mixing does not explain present ancestry patterns in East Asians. 

finch

Researchers sequenced 120 finches from the Galápagos and Cocos Island to resolve bird phylogeny and explore the genetic basis of fast-evolving features.

Researchers used histone marks associated with active promotors or enhancers to explore regulatory element evolution in 20 diverse mammalian species.

Killer whale, walrus, manatee, and bottlenose dolphin sequences suggest convergent molecular evolution often occurs independent of shared phenotypic adaptations.

The team tracked down several hundred SNPs in the Ebola genome, including mutations that could alter the effectiveness of treatments targeting certain virus sequences.

Using a combination of genotyping and sequencing, an international team traces the history of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis lineage and its links to drug resistance.

The paper describes a method of identifying genetic markers for reconstructing the phylogeny of the Penstemon genus from low coverage WGS data.

Genome sequences from ancient horses that lived thousands of years before domestication are serving as a resource for studying the domestication process. 

Pages

A South African university has told the Wellcome Sanger Institute to return DNA samples it has from indigenous African communities, The Times reports.

The University of California, Berkeley's Rasmus Nielsen and Xinzhu Wei have retracted their CCR5 gene paper due to a technical artifact.

 

University of Virginia researchers are exploring a genetic risk test to gauge type 1 diabetes risk, NPR reports.

In PNAS this week: researchers compare two high-grade neuroendocrine lung cancers, height among ancient Europeans, and more.