evolution

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: effector proteins contributing to Legionnaires' disease virulence, proteomic analysis of transition to quiescence, and more.

University of Chicago researchers combined epidemiological and viral gene evolution data to refine influenza modeling.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: grape genomes give insight into domestication, columnar cacti classification, and more.

Investigators saw muted negative selection against mutations in genomic data for more than 7,600 tumors, while mining positive selection patterns for cancer driver clues.

New Mexico is re-doing its proposed science education standards after criticism, the Associated Press reports.

A genome-wide association study involving almost 1,600 African individuals led to diverse skin pigmentation-associated loci with varied effects on the complex trait.

Los Alamos researchers voice concerns about proposed science education standards in New Mexico, the Associated Press reports.

Several studies describe a new Neanderthal genome, Neanderthal sequence effects on human traits, and ancient hunter-gatherer population social structure clues.

With genetic data for seven Stone and Iron Age individuals, researchers estimate that human populations in southern Africa started diverging more than 260,000 years ago.

Data from hundreds of individuals suggest that the country's populations are genetically diverse, with a long history of genetic isolation and differentiation.

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A genomic analysis of modern and ancient maize reveals a complicated domestication history, according to Reuters.

In PLOS this week: MYRF variant linked to congenital diaphragmatic hernia, analysis of the "dragon's blood" red resin produced by traditional medicine plants, and more.

CNBC reports that half of academic researchers leave after about five years.

Researchers have used genetic analysis to confirm a new type of salamander, the New York Times reports.