evolution

This Week in Science

In Science this week: new donkey genome assembly, visualization of the herpes simplex virus, and more.

Blue whale

By sequencing and comparing sequences from several baleen whale species, researchers saw uncovered sympatric whale speciation and evolutionary networks.

Sequencing has helped clarify the baleen whale family tree, though the researchers tell the New York Times it's more of a phylogenetic network.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: protein destabilizing mutations can drive evolution, and more.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: sequenced genomes of five additional Neanderthals, and more.

The researchers estimated that the newly sequenced late Neanderthals likely split from the lineage leading to much older Altai Neanderthal roughly 150,000 years ago.

Solenodon

Using an atypical assembly strategy, researchers tackled the genome of Solenodon paradoxus, an endangered venomous, shrew-like animal from Hispaniola.

Research on phages in CRISPR-Cas9-containing Escherichia coli indicated that pressure exerted by the bacterial defense system can boost phage mutation frequency.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: ramifications of sexual recombination in bacteria, Mycobacterium leprae genome sequences, and more.

Still Evolving

A new paper in PNAS finds that people are still evolving, but with increased pressure on weight and decreased pressure on intelligence.

Pages

University of California, San Diego, researchers have developed a gene drive to control a fruit-destroying fly.

A new study of a β-thalassemia gene therapy appears promising, according to NPR.

In Nature this week: hair color genes, hybridization between 13-year and 17-year cicadas, and more.

Futurism writes that gene doping could be the next generation of cheating in sports.