cell-free DNA

The firm plans to launch a nasopharyngeal carcinoma test in Asia this year and is developing breast cancer tests to supplement mammograms.

Milwaukee, Wis.-based TAI Diagnostics is developing a PCR-based assay for cell-free DNA as a way to monitor the health of transplanted organs.

Technologies gained one of their first solid footholds in the clinical care of cancer patients with adoption into the treatment paradigm of lung cancer, while researchers turned their eyes to proving utility in other niches.

The China Food and Drug Administration had also previously accredited both the NIFTY test and the BGISEQ sequencing platform.

The new European initiative promises to deliver multiple new tests and methods for improving the treatment of breast cancer and rectal cancer.

The company said that it is working on cfDNA claim extensions for various PCR and NGS assays in its portfolio, which would be compatible with the new extraction system.

Labs reported on their work with kits from both Roche and Thermo Fisher, both of which have launched new commercial liquid biopsy products in recent years.

The company presented new data from its validation of the PCR-based approach at a conference, citing plans to advance the kit for monitoring and early detection applications.

Participants shared data from head-to-head assay comparisons, reflected on the advancement of NGS and digital PCR methods, and discussed new standardization projects.

The researchers plan to evaluate cfDNA and single cells isolated from the urine of patients who have had kidney transplants to identify signs of graft failure.

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A University of California, Los Angeles-led team has found turning off the CCR5 gene could improve recovery after a stroke, according to Scientific American.

South Dakota lawmakers are to weigh a bill aimed at teaching the strengths and weaknesses of scientific concepts, the Associated Press and KEVN-Black Hills Fox report.

In Science this week: the synthetic genetic system hachimoji, and more.

Thermo Fisher Scientific says it will no longer sell machines in China's Xinjiang region, according to the Wall Street Journal.