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cell-free DNA

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: methylation patterns trace cell-free DNA to tissue of origin, cell surface proteome of Ewing sarcoma tumor cells, and more.

The team said their approach may have several applications, including evaluation of cellular response to therapies, and early diagnosis of diseases like cancer.

Researchers have designed new strategies to distinguish true variants from errors when trying to call very low frequency mutations in circulating tumor DNA.

Despite the gains it recorded for revenues in the quarter and the full year, the firm missed analyst estimates for both revenues and net loss for Q4 and 2015.

The firm found that for sub-chromosomal copy number variants, the test had a sensitivity of 97.7 percent and a specificity of 99.9 percent.

The company, based in Constance, Germany, is launching three liquid biopsy assays as a research service this week that differ in target size and sensitivity.

The study found that by inferring the original pattern of nucleosomes in cell-free DNA, the particular tissue of origin for these molecules can be predicted.

The company will use the money to push forward its technology and its market position in the cell-free DNA liquid biopsy space.

Both companies are using their assays to detect genetic alterations that confer a higher chance of response to the drug in a newly-announced Phase 2 trial.

The company is now offering a test covering about 3,000 hotspots in 50 genes for 10 cancer types that can be performed on sample volumes as low as 50 microliters.

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Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Slate's Jane Hu compares some at-home genetic tests to astrology.

In PLOS this week: analysis of polygenic risk scores for skin cancer, chronic pain GWAS, and more.