cancer subtypes

Researchers investigated the possibility of picking up intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in tumor exomes, identifying false-positives and technical noise.

An analysis of matched tumor-normal samples from dozens of colorectal cancer patients pointed to microbiome differences related to mutations and other tumor features.

Members of the Beat AML consortium uncovered relationships between somatic mutations, gene expression profiles, and sensitivity to more than 100 drugs.

Mayo Clinic researchers found that cytogenetic subtypes containing three translocations were more common in individuals with a greater proportion of African ancestry.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's technology is based on set of patient-cell derived gene signatures for classifying four pancreatic subtypes.

Researchers found that the diverse features in mixed phenotype acute leukemia may stem from early blood progenitor mutations.

Using archived tumor samples from individuals with glioblastoma, researchers saw methylation variability at progression, along with potential prognostic hints.

A PCR-based analysis of nearly 700 cases picked up human papillomavirus or human polyomaviruses DNA in a fraction of urothelial bladder carcinoma tumors.

Two new studies have uncovered expression-defined T cell subsets that seem to coincide with better or worse outcomes in breast cancer or non-small cell lung cancer.

The firm has developed a new classifier for bladder cancer and continues to work with pharma companies in the lung cancer space.

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The United Nations is to consider a ban on field testing gene drives at a meeting being held next week, Technology Review reports.

The Associated Press reports that gene-edited food may soon be for sale.

The US Department of Health and Human Services is beginning a series of meetings on human fetal tissue research, Stat News reports.

In Cell this week: epigenetic change linked to glioblastomas, rare and low-frequency variants contributing to multiple sclerosis risk, and more.