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cancer screening

Clinical researchers at AACR discussed a wide range of approaches focusing on several different potential use-cases in the detection or assessment of early cancers.

An Australian research team found that population genetic screening for hereditary cancer and for carrier status could be cost-effective.

After raising $320M in venture capital, Tempus hopes to sequence 100,000 samples in 2019 as it expands its precision medicine program into depression and diabetes.

The company presented a poster at the ACG meeting this week that reported over 80 percent sensitivity in a retrospective cohort with a majority of early-stage cancers.

The German company validated the panel, which focuses on actionable results, in a 300-participant clinical study in collaboration with Robert-Bosch-Hospital in Stuttgart.

The team demonstrated that the approach can yield high sensitivity while maintaining near-perfect specificity, but it must now replicate the early results in a much larger study.

Wired reports on how genetic genealogy's use in forensics has exploded in the year since an arrest in the Golden State Killer case was made.

Retraction Watch reports that the increase in retracted papers at a journal is due to more resources there to tackle publication ethics.

New York City has settled with a forensic scientist who was fired after questioning a DNA testing approach used by the medical examiner's office, the New York Times reports.

In Nature this week: technique for measuring replication fork movement, WINTHER trial results, and more.