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BRCA testing

Testing Less Likely

Women with breast or ovarian cancer living in medically underserved regions of the US are less likely to get recommended BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic testing, according to a new study.

Not as Much Testing

The Wall Street Journal reports that men seek genetic testing for inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations much less often than women.

DeCode's new offering adds to an ongoing controversy over whether people in the island country have a right to know if they are at increased risk for disease.

To Make Sure

CNBC reports that confirming a positive result from 23andMe's BRCA health report can be expensive.

The FDA will consider the companion diagnostic application alongside data for Pfizer's talazoparib in BRCA-mutated advanced breast cancer.

The Center for Genomic Interpretation and NSGC want payors to cover confirmatory testing for patients with positive results from 23andMe's FDA-cleared test.

The funding will be available to members of the Association of Community Cancer Centers, a cancer care provider advocacy group.

A Phase III randomized trial uncovered enhanced carboplatin response in advanced triple-negative breast cancer patients with germline mutations affecting BRCA1/2.

Doctors and patients are still trying to figure out what role at-home genetic testing should play in healthcare, Newsweek says.

23andMe's Anne Wojcicki writes in an opinion piece at Stat News that people can understand their genetic risk information without the input of experts.

Pages

Researchers representing scientists and students of Chinese descent voice their concerns about recent US policies and rhetoric.

Wired reports that researchers have shown they could reprogram a DNA-based computer.

Researchers say increased diversity in genomic studies will benefit all, PBS NewsHour reports.

In Science this week: whole-genome sequencing of single sperm cells, and more.