BRCA testing

The agency has granted the drug and CDx priority review, which Myriad expects to conclude during its fiscal third-quarter ending March 31, 2018.

Testing for Free

Australia makes genetic testing for women with family history of breast or ovarian cancer freely available, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

How It Affects Them

Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations tell the Washington Post how learning their status has affected their life choices.

New research suggests some individuals with germline BRCA1/2 mutations who develop cancer may benefit from tumor BRCA functionality testing prior to treatment.

The company has made agreements with two cancer diagnostics firms — GenomeDx, and Cynvenio — bundling its hereditary germline analysis with their somatic tests.

The researchers suggested that Ashkenazi Jewish women as well as women of other ancestries might benefit from broader genetic screening for breast cancer risk.

NGeneBio is moving ahead with plans to have the test cleared for diagnostic use in Korea, while envisioning a 2019 submission to the US FDA.

Results of a new study offer preliminary evidence that blood tests could select patients for treatment, and track response and resistance.

Myriad said it will submit a supplementary premarket approval application for its BRACAnalysis CDx, which the FDA originally approved in 2014.

Respondents to a 2013 survey described changes in the way hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk is assessed, interpreted, and conveyed to patients following the court decision.

Pages

Using DNA to sketch crime victims might not be a great idea, the NYTimes says.

Science has its own problem with sexual harassment. What do we do with the research these abusers produce, Wired asks.

Senate Republicans led by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) are trying to change how the government funds basic research, reports ScienceInsider.

In Science this week: combining genomics and ecology to better understand the effects of natural selection on evolution, and more.