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BRCA Biomarkers

News and reporting on BRCA biomarkers.

Amid rapid adoption of multi-gene panels, ACMG experts are seeing some doctors and patients taking actions they shouldn't.

Absent sufficient evidence to support genetic testing for all patients, the group recommended following existing guidelines, which are based on clinical factors.

The guidelines place a stronger emphasis on pancreatic cancer risk genes, and broaden testing recommendations for those with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry.

Doctors can now order the test to identify breast cancer patients with BRCA1/2 mutations who may be eligible for surgery or targeted therapy.

Genetic testing results increasingly inform clinical decisions, though the inclusion of hereditary risk genes beyond BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 sparked debate.

For heavily pretreated ovarian cancer patients, doctors will now have to weigh their HRD status in the context of an increasingly complex backdrop of biomarker information.

Researchers found that 14 percent of individuals with metastatic breast cancer had risky mutations germline mutations, including patients who did not meet testing criteria.

Even Earlier Edits?

NPR reports that researchers in New York are investigating whether it is possible to edit the genomes of human sperm.

Slightly Larger Pool

New guidelines say that more women may benefit from genetic testing for hereditary breast or ovarian cancer, according to the Los Angeles Times.

After reviewing more than 100 studies, the panel issued recommendations focused on women with a personal or family history of BRCA1/2-related cancers or high-risk ancestry.

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Gene editing could be an issue competitive sports need to address soon, four researchers from Arizona State University write at Slate.

A genetic alteration appears to increase heart failure risk among people of African descent, according to the Washington Post.

In his look back at the past decade, BuzzFeed News' Peter Aldhous writes that direct-to-consumer genetic testing has led to "Facebook for genes."

In Nature this week: genetic "clock" that can predict the lifespans of vertebrates, new assembler called wtdbg2, and more.