adaptation

Velociraptor mongoliensis

Using bioinformatic and molecular cytogenetic approaches, researchers retraced ancestral "diapsid" reptile genome patterns from extant bird and reptile genomes.

Sequencing the genomes of a half a dozen chimp- or gorilla-infecting malaria parasites provided a clearer picture of Plasmodium falciparum evolution.

With genome sequences and/or array-based genotypes for ancient and modern individuals in Patagonia, researchers retraced hunter-gatherer population history.

Blue whale

By sequencing and comparing sequences from several baleen whale species, researchers saw uncovered sympatric whale speciation and evolutionary networks.

The researchers estimated that the newly sequenced late Neanderthals likely split from the lineage leading to much older Altai Neanderthal roughly 150,000 years ago.

Solenodon

Using an atypical assembly strategy, researchers tackled the genome of Solenodon paradoxus, an endangered venomous, shrew-like animal from Hispaniola.

Using haplotype profiling, phylogenetics, and other analyses, researchers retraced sickle allele emergence to a single event occurring roughly 7,300 years ago.

Researchers discovered thousands of candidate functional elements by searching diverse mammalian genomes for regions of accelerated evolution within highly conserved sites.

Using genomic data for hundreds of ancient Europeans, research teams retraced the spread of the Beaker complex culture as well as interactions between pastoralists and hunter-gatherers.

Research on phages in CRISPR-Cas9-containing Escherichia coli indicated that pressure exerted by the bacterial defense system can boost phage mutation frequency.

Pages

Lawmakers have asked four direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies to explain their privacy policies and security measures, according to Stat News.

The Trump Administration has proposed a plan to reorganize the federal government, the Washington Post reports.

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.