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The Scan

In Nature this week: resequencing hundreds of chickpea varieties gives peek into its domestication, and more.

In an initial vote, the US National Academy of Sciences approved an amendment to allow the expulsion of members who violate its code of conduct, according to the Verge.

New Scientist reports that songbirds have an extra chromosome within their germline, but not other, cells.

But Also, Education

The Campaign for Science and Engineering's Sarah Main writes at the Guardian that increased R&D spending should also come with investment in education.

In Cell this week: DNA-based survey of marine virus genomes,  single-cell atlas of tumor proteomic profiles, and more.

The US National Institutes of Health has prevented two doctors critical of a study from speaking with investigators, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The Hill reports that Democrats in the US House of Representatives have proposed adding about $2 billion to the National Institutes of Health budget for 2020.

Australia's ABC News looks into what's next after the country decides not to regulate some gene editing of plants and animals.

In PNAS this week: core Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome, study of ancient Paget's disease of the bone, and more.

FBI Search at uBiome

The Wall Street Journal reports that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has searched uBiome's office as part of an inquiry into its billing practices.

An Australian twin study finds that environmental factors rather than genetic ones may sway early cavity development, Reuters reports.

The red lionfish genome may give insight into invasive species success, North Carolina State University researchers say.

In PLOS this week: HLA-region changes linked to lupus risk among East Asians, epigenome-wide association study of maternal circadian rhythm, and more.

Elsevier and a Norwegian consortium come to a "read-and-publish" agreement, according to Nature News.

Blue Cheese Origins

Researchers in France have explored the genetic history of the blue cheese mold, Forbes reports.

The South China Morning Post reports eight genetic testing firms in Hong Kong are under scrutiny for potentially misleading consumers.

In Science this week: platform to diagnose genetic disease in children, lung disease-causing genetic mutation corrected in mice, and more.

Wired reports on how genetic genealogy's use in forensics has exploded in the year since an arrest in the Golden State Killer case was made.

New York City has settled with a forensic scientist who was fired after questioning a DNA testing approach used by the medical examiner's office, the New York Times reports.

Retraction Watch reports that the increase in retracted papers at a journal is due to more resources there to tackle publication ethics.

In Nature this week: technique for measuring replication fork movement, WINTHER trial results, and more.

Ah, Feel Full Now

People reports that researchers have uncovered genetic variants that lead people to always feel full.

The Oregon state Senate unanimously passed a bill that would make it easier for people convicted of crimes to initiate DNA testing of evidence, according to the Associated Press.

Florida state senators are to weigh a bill prohibiting life insurance companies from using genetic information in coverage decisions, according to Florida Politics.

In Genome Research this week: metagenomic sequencing assay that detects pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid, single-tube long fragment read approach, and more.

Pages

A UK survey of researchers who identified as LGBT+ and allies uncovered evidence of unwelcoming workplace climates in the physical sciences.

At the Guardian, the University of Edinburgh's Nikolay Ogryzko argues that universities need to better invest in postdocs' careers.

Researchers who go persevere after an early funding setback end up with more highly cited papers later on, according to the Economist.

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.