The Scan

A US Food and Drug Administration panel recommends that the agency approve a gene therapy for pediatric leukemia, the New York Times reports.

Galloping Horse

Harvard University's George Church and his colleagues encoded a GIF into a bacterial population.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: bacteriophage evolution varies based on host, lifestyle, and genetic factors; and more.

MinION in the Clinic

UK clinicians are to begin a trial using Oxford Nanopore's MinION to diagnose pneumonia, according to the Telegraph.

Soil Startup

Forbes reports that Trace Genomics is analyzing customers' soil to determine what beneficial and harmful microbes are there that may affect agricultural endeavors.

If the Numbers Say OK

San Diego-based venture capital firm relies on an algorithm to choose which biotech startups to back, according to Stat News.

In Genome Biology this week: Parsi population history, genetic relationships between Sherpa and Tibetan populations, and more.

Unsafe Feeling

A survey finds that women of color feel unsafe working in the sciences because of both their race and gender, according to Buzzfeed News.

Unsure of What to Do

Office of Science and Technology Policy staffers are without direction on some initiatives, Nature News reports.

Rise of the Preprint

Wired takes a look at the increasing adoption of preprints in biology.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: sand rat genome assembly, algorithm for human leukocyte antigen typing from short-read data, and more.

Mail-Order Pox

Canadian researchers have re-created the horsepox virus, ScienceInsider reports.

Goalie Genes

Deadspin reports on a company that offers genetic testing for soccer players.

NantWorks' Patrick Soon-Shiong has purchased a stake in a hospital system, Healthcare IT News reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: CLDN10B isoform in rare genetic ­­­condition, role of oral microbiome in cavities, and more.

Fitzgerald for CDC

Stat News reports that the Trump administration has selected Brenda Fitzgerald to run the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers examine selection at a derived allele that's linked to shorter height and increased osteoarthritis, the New York Times reports.

Come Back Again Soon

Researchers examine humpback whale mitochondrial DNA to shed light on their population structure in a new study.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: wild tetraploid wheat genome, and more.

Or Maybe OK

A new BioRxiv preprint says the variants another research team attributed to off-target effects of CRISPR/Cas9 could be natural variation, New Scientist reports.

Found Its Branch

Ancient mitochondrial genome analysis gives the enigmatic Macrauchenia a place on the phylogenetic tree, the New York Times reports.

Micropigs on Hold

BGI won't be selling the gene-edited miniaturized pigs it developed, according to Technology Review.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: new Neanderthal mitochondrial genome, and more.

Make It Routine

The chief medical officer of England has called for genomic testing to be a routine part of care, the Guardian reports.

CBS News reports that the science division of the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy has no more staffers, though the White House says it does.

Pages

A research duo finds that science and technology graduate students who turn away from academic careers do so because of changes in their own interests.

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.

Gladys Kong writes at Fortune that her STEM background has helped her as a CEO.