The Scan

York University researchers find genomic evidence of inbreeding in the yellow-banded bumblebee, according to Reuters.

Bunch at Once

The Scientist reports agricultural researchers are working on a gene-stacking tool.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: statistical method for overcoming case-control imbalance issues, and more.

Three immunology researchers are to receive this year's Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research, the Albany Times-Union reports.

Testing Less Likely

Women with breast or ovarian cancer living in medically underserved regions of the US are less likely to get recommended BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic testing, according to a new study.

Elephants may have "re-animated" a pseudogene to help stave off cancer, according to the New York Times.

In Genome Research this week: clonal evolution analysis of acute myeloid leukemia, computational pipeline to examine relationships between bacterial pathogens, and more.

Varied Opinions

The Union of Concerned Scientists surveyed US government scientists about Trump Administration policies and more, Science reports.

Cell Count

NPR reports on Human Cell Atlas Consortium's effort to catalog all the different cell types within the human body.

National Geographic reports that marine mammals have lost a gene that could make them more susceptible to organophosphate damage.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: history and genetic diversity of the scarlet macaw, approach for predicting human flu virus evolution, and more.

An RNAi Approval

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Alnylam's RNAi-based therapy Onpattro, according to Stat News.

Stop It There

Researchers in the UK are working on using gene drives to control malaria-carrying mosquitoes, the Telegraph reports.

Keep It Going

Harvard Medical School's Seth Cassel and Cigall Kadoch argue in a Baltimore Sun op-ed that the recent TAILORx trial shows the potential of genomic-based medicine.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: genetic architecture mediating gene expression, metabolomic patterns in multiple myeloma, and more.

Reuters reports that smaller companies are getting in on gene editing for agricultural uses.

To Build the Database

In an opinion piece at the Guardian, Adam Rutherford consumer genetic testing customers realize they are the product.

Promise and Limits

Nature News looks into the limitations of patient-derived xenograft mice.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: single-cell mRNA sequencing of human renal cells, and more.

In a pair of commentaries, researchers critique last year's paper reporting the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to correct a mutation in viable human embryos.

Inside Edition reports that people are now hosting parties where they learn what breed their dogs are based on genetic testing.

Not as Much Testing

The Wall Street Journal reports that men seek genetic testing for inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations much less often than women.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic regions associated with tameness in foxes, and more.

The Salk Institute has settled two of the three gender discrimination lawsuits brought against it last year, Science reports.

Just Never

Australian groups develop guidelines that say sexual or romantic relationships between academic supervisors and their students are never acceptable.

Pages

Gene editing is expected to give rise to new job opportunities, according to BBC Capital.

A new analysis finds that better grant-writing skills may help early-career researchers stay funded and stay in academia.

At Nature, a graduate student describes how to explore careers outside academia and what PhD programs can do help that search.

A new analysis of research funding finds that after receiving their first award, female researchers are just about as likely to receive additional awards as male researchers.