The Scan

Futurism writes that gene doping could be the next generation of cheating in sports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: hair color genes, hybridization between 13-year and 17-year cicadas, and more.

Of Mice and Microbes

Mice in New York harbor both antibiotic-resistant bacteria and novel viruses, according to a new analysis of their fecal microbiomes.

So Many Choices

The Associated Press reports that an ethicist predicts that prenatal diagnosis and other advances will lead to more choices being available to prospective parents.

Human Heredity and Health in Africa Initiative has issued guidelines for genomic research in the region, according to Nature News.

In Genome Biology this week: approach to analyze alternative polyadenylation, algorithm to predict transcriptomic structural variations, and more.

The New York Times reports that genetic screening is increasingly offered as an employee benefit.

CRISPR Regulation

In an essay at Foreign Affairs, University of Pennsylvania researchers discuss how to best regulate CRISPR gene editing.

Targets for Treatment

UK researchers have uncovered about 80 proteins that could be targeted to treat prostate cancer, the Times reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: splicing patterns within triple-negative breast cancer, new flySAM tool, and more.

This year's March for Science had a lower turnout than last year, but Wired writes that supporters are focusing on elections.

And, Go

The Telegraph reports that UK regulators gave CRISPR Therapeutics the go-ahead for its beta thalassemia clinical trial.

Handful for PAH

A team of Cambridge researchers use sequencing to find gene mutations linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension, BBC News reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: tick salivary transcriptome, genetic risk scores for type 1 diabetes, and more.

Sweet Potato Puzzle

Researchers turn to genetic analysis to unravel how sweet potatoes spread from the Americas to Polynesia, the New York Times reports.

Michigan Radio reports that a parent there has filed a lawsuit over its newborn screening program.

Spain plans to increase its R&D budget, but Science reports that only a fraction of that will go to researchers.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: method to uncover natural products from fungus, and more.

Researchers are working on RNA inference-based pesticides for crops, according to Digital Trends.

Very Own Vaccine

Researchers find that a personalized ovarian cancer vaccine appears safe, the Los Angeles Times reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: sequencing and phenotyping of more than 1,000 Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates, and more.

Researchers report that even people with a high genetic risk of heart disease benefit from exercise, according to Time magazine.

Ready to Go, But?

Technology Review writes that though CRISPR trials in people are beginning, studies in monkeys haven't provided much data.

All the Residents

A state in India is teaming up with a German company to develop a blockchain-based database of genomic data, according to Quartz.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: tool for examining transcription factor-DNA binding intensities, algorithm for classifying metagenomic sequence data, and more.

Pages

A National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report calls for changing metrics to make STEM graduate school more student-centered, according to Science.

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.

An analysis of speakers at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting finds that women are less likely to be invited to talk, according to the Guardian.

An analysis appearing in PeerJ finds that social media mentions of a paper may lead to increased citations.