The Scan

Just Skip that Step

The Economist writes that an increasing number of scientific journals don't do peer review.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic overlap among many psychiatric disorders, and more.

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions is considering using DNA tests to determine relatedness between adult and child migrants, the Daily Caller reports.

Bloomberg reports that Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics plans to offer a treatment it is developing under the "right to try" law for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

How Old Were They?

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers report being able to determine age from dried bloodstains, Discover's D-brief blog reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: expansion of disease-resistance genes among long-lived oak trees, and more.

A new report highlights the potential threats posed by advances in synthetic biology, NPR reports.

Johns Hopkins University's Steven Salzberg and his colleagues have come up with a new estimate for the number of human genes, Nature News reports.

A Bloomberg reporter tried to get her genetic data deleted, but found it's not so simple to do.

In Genome Research this week: study of intra-tumor heterogeneity, workflow resources for EPIGEN-Brazil, and more.

Dual Listings Sought

Oxford Nanopore Technologies is looking into dual listings in London and Hong Kong, according to the South China Morning Post.

More Proposed for NSF

US lawmakers proposed increasing the National Science Foundation budget, including its facilities account, Science reports.

The New York Times looks into medical research funding in the US and how the grant system might not be funding the best work.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: effects of gene deletions on bacterial metabolic networks, genetic responses to sea star wasting disease, and more.

A federal grand jury has indicted Elizabeth Holmes and Ramesh Balwani for alleged wire fraud in conjunction with their activities at Theranos.

Already Used

A direct-to-consumer genetic testing company sent out used spit kits, CNBC reports.

Mixed Reaction

Nature News reports that some developers are nervous about GitHub's acquisition by Microsoft.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: comparison of commercial bisulfite kits, new method to predict essential proteins, and more

NIH Boost Proposed

A draft bill released by the US House of Representatives appropriations committee would increase the 2019 National Institutes of Health budget by 3 percent.

NBC News reports on the Earth BioGenome Project, which aims to sequence all eukaryotic life on Earth.

Bloomberg looks into privacy issues raised by law enforcement's use of genetic genealogy sites.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: environmental DNA can help in studies of marine animals, and more.

23andMe has found a possible genetic link to becoming 'hangry', according to US News & World Report.

The Personalized Medicine Coalition defends the US Food and Drug Administration from criticism on its push to shorten the regulatory review process.

CBC News reports that a genetic study of hearing is relying on Newfoundland's founder population.

Pages

At Nature, a graduate student describes how to explore careers outside academia and what PhD programs can do help that search.

A new analysis of research funding finds that after receiving their first award, female researchers are just about as likely to receive additional awards as male researchers.

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.

At Nature, the University of Alberta's Devang Mehta calls on PIs to engage in conversations about racism.