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The Scan

In Cell this week: small proteins identified among human microbiome, role for tumor microbes in pancreatic cancer survival, and more.

Holden Thorp is to be the new editor-in-chief of Science and its related journals.

Adelaide University has suspended the head of an ancient DNA lab as its investigation of workplace bullying continues, Australia's ABC News reports.

A genetic analysis of salmon scales collected over the course of a century points to a sharp decline in the number of fish returning each year to river in British Columbia, CBC reports.

In PNAS this week: gene expression profiles of adipocyte subtypes, computational approach for improving plant expressome analysis, and more.

To Give a Microbiome?

Nature News reports there are a handful of clinical trials underway to evaluate vaginal microbiome seeding of newborns born via caesarian section.

Researchers uncovered the HIV virus within a tissue sample collected in 1966, the Atlantic reports.

The Washington Post writes that humans may have contributed to the extinction of cave bears some 20,000 years ago.

In PLOS this week: gene variant may protect against trypanosomiasis, GLIS3 role in type 2 diabetes, and more.

At a meeting this week, researchers and others discussed the regulatory oversight needed for germline genome editing.

Web of Neutrophil DNA

Researchers report that neutrophil extracellular traps appear to binds gallstones together, according to New Scientist.

More Scrutiny

The US Food and Drug Administration has asked questions about Myriad Genetics' GeneSight test, according to Bloomberg.

In Science this week: approach to infer genotype-by-environment interaction from genetic variants associated with phenotypic variability, and more.

Novartis replaced two top executives from its AveXis unit following data manipulation during early testing of its new gene therapy, Reuters reports.

ScienceInsider reports that researchers funded through the Cancer Moonshot program will have to make their papers immediately accessible to the public.

In Nature this week: circular consensus sequencing method to sequence and assemble a human genome, a new CRISPR platform using the Cpf1 endonuclease, and more.

Researchers in California link additional genes to autism risk, HealthDay News reports.

Adding in Diversity

Through the NeuroGAP-Psychosis program, researchers hope to include more individuals of African ancestry in genetic research, as they write at WBUR.

Australian researchers are studying the prevalence of genetic alterations among men with metastatic prostate cancer, the Financial Review reports.

In Genome Research this week: copy number variant analysis of Anopheles gambiae, comparison of approaches to predict transcription factor activity, and more.

Two Utah cases represent the promise and pitfalls of using genetic genealogy in law enforcement, the Salt Lake Tribune reports.

Know How It's Used

The Wall Street Journal reports that patients might be unaware of hospitals' exclusive agreements with drugmakers for access to genetic data.

The New York Times writes that genes may influence when people prefer to sleep.

In PNAS this week: genomic turnover among pig ancestors, role of lncRNAs in vaccine-induced immunity, and more.

Kary Mullis Dies

Kary Mullis, who won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1993 for his work on PCR has died at 74, South Carolina's The State reports.

 

Pages

A proposed rule would deem graduate students at private institutions to not be employees, which ScienceInsider reports might affect unionization efforts.

A new study finds that a positive lab environment can encourage undergraduates to continue to perform research.

A new analysis suggests non-US citizen STEM PhDs might pass up jobs at US-based startups due to visa concerns.

A UK survey of researchers who identified as LGBT+ and allies uncovered evidence of unwelcoming workplace climates in the physical sciences.