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The Scan

Open it Up

Former editor of open-access journal eLife, Randy Schekman, tells Nature News that open access scientific publishing is the future.

$900,000

An independent nonprofit organization has determined that a Novartis gene therapy drug would be cost-effective up to $900,000, Reuters reports.

Janelia Research Campus' new executive director Ron Vale recently chatted with ScienceInsider about how investigators will work with the new 15-year time frame for focus areas at the campus.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: the VGLL4 Hippo pathway transcription co-factor-coding gene in heart valve function, the Mycobacterium ulcerans pathogen and its potential mosquito carriers in Australia, and more.

Better Recovery

A University of California, Los Angeles-led team has found turning off the CCR5 gene could improve recovery after a stroke, according to Scientific American.

South Dakota lawmakers are to weigh a bill aimed at teaching the strengths and weaknesses of scientific concepts, the Associated Press and KEVN-Black Hills Fox report.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: the synthetic genetic system hachimoji, and more.

No More

Thermo Fisher Scientific says it will no longer sell machines in China's Xinjiang region, according to the Wall Street Journal.

HeLa Variety

The University of Zurich's Ruedi Aebersold and his colleagues analyzed a dozen HeLa cell lines to find differences in gene expression, protein levels, and more.

Dunno What Those Do

New Scientist reports that 20 percent of human and yeast proteins are uncharacterized.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: protein-coding variants associated with body-fat distribution, and more.

To Know What's Wrong

A new study finds that the majority of patients at a Tijuana clinic received a diagnosis after first-line genome sequencing, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

Lasting Mark

Researchers may experience the effects of the government shutdown for a while, the Los Angeles Times reports.

For Fewer Mosquitos

NPR reports that researchers in Italy are testing a gene drive aimed at controlling mosquito populations.

In Genome Biology this week: post-transcriptional modification-based stratification of glioblastoma, single-cell analysis of gene expression and methylation in human iPSCs, and more.

Kelvin Droegemeier, the new science advisor, spoke at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, Geekwire reports.

New results from the NASA Twins Study indicate that the immune system may rev up when in space, the Washington Post reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: whole-genome assembly for the white shark, paper-based microfluidic method for detecting the malaria parasite, and more.

WHO Panel Announced

The World Health Organization has announced the members of its gene-editing committee, according to NPR.

DARPA is working on developing algorithms that gauge the credibility of research findings, Wired reports.

The American Society of Breast Surgeons recommends all women diagnosed with breast cancer be offered genetic testing, the Washington Post says.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: comparison of modern, historical rabbit exomes uncovers parallel evolution after myxoma virus exposure; and more.

Small but Disruptive

A trio of researchers examines the effects of small and large research teams on their fields, according to the New York Times.

Business Insider reports on efforts to apply genetic engineering to cacao plants.

And Now, Science

The Huffington Post writes that with new leadership, science is coming back to the US House of Representatives science committee.

Pages

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.

A new analysis by Northwestern University researchers finds that female and male first-time PIs receive differing amounts of funding.

Some 43 percent of new mothers and 23 percent of new fathers leave full-time employment in STEM in the years after having a child, Science Careers says.

STEM professors' views on intelligence affect students' success, a new study finds.