The Scan

This Week in Science

In Science this week: single-cell tools named Breakthrough of the Year winner, differences in gut microbiome composition and function in people with bowel disease, and more.

No Other Way

A workshop concludes that for some studies there is no good alternative to using human fetal tissue, ScienceInsider reports.

A judge has dismissed a lawsuit brought by Human Longevity against the J. Craig Venter Institute.

José Baselga, the former chief medical officer of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, has now resigned as editor-in-chief of a cancer journal, the New York Times and ProPublica report.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: extension to uncultivated virus genome reporting standards, multiplex orthogonal CRISPR-based genome editing approach, and more.

A partial US government shutdown would affect scientific research, Nature News says.

Dual Challenges

The Washington Post reports on uncertainties facing gene-edited livestock endeavors.

Researchers have engineered a plant that could help alleviate indoor air pollution, the Guardian reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: updated Aspergillus niger genome annotation, high-throughput sequencing strategy for profiling RNA structure, and more.

 Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), who chairs the Senate health committee, will be retiring at the end of his term, Stat News reports.

Tracing the Bugs

The Wall Street Journal reports on the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's use of genetic approaches to study foodborne illnesses.

Second X Helping

UCSF researchers find that having two X chromosomes may contribute to women's longer lifespans, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: immune cell profiling of wild baboons by social status, metabolomics profiling of esophageal tumors, and more.

Corn's Complex Path

A genomic analysis of modern and ancient maize reveals a complicated domestication history, according to Reuters.

Five and Gone

CNBC reports that half of academic researchers leave after about five years.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: MYRF variant linked to congenital diaphragmatic hernia, analysis of the "dragon's blood" red resin produced by traditional medicine plants, and more.

From Within the Swamp

Researchers have used genetic analysis to confirm a new type of salamander, the New York Times reports.

Standards Needed

In an editorial, officials from scientific societies in the US and China call for the international community to develop criteria and standards for human germline editing.

Faster Profiles

The Washington Post reports on a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan to place rapid DNA analyzers at booking stations around the country.

Conflict Search

The US National Institutes of Health is to review studies that have received private support for conflicts of interest, according to the New York Times.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: the PsychENCODE Consortium reports on the molecular mechanisms of neuropsychiatric disorders, and more.

Scramble for Tissue

Stat News reports that the pause on procuring fetal tissue for intramural US National Institutes of Health research will soon affect additional labs there.

The Wall Street Journal reports there is uncertainty surrounding whether He Jiankui's embryo editing did what he said it did.

Weigh the Knowledge

Customers might want to consider what they might learn about their risk of diseases like Alzheimer's before snagging the genetic testing kits that are on many gift guides this year, NJ.com writes.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of the invasive fall webworm, amp of constrained coding regions within the human genome, and more.

Pages

STEM professors' views on intelligence affect students' success, a new study finds.

Mental health issues are more likely to affect graduate students than other Americans, Scientific American reports.

Researchers find that younger investigators fare better when seeking support through crowdfunding sites, Nature News reports.

Nature News reports that doing a postdoc might not help researchers find employment.