The Scan

Unreported

The results from many clinical trials don't see the light of day, Vox reports.

'Order From Nothing'

A physicist has suggested that life is a result of thermodynamics, according to Quanta Magazine.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: deep evolutionary conservation of autism-linked genes, cytokine signature of chronic fatigue syndrome, and more.

University of Copenhagen researchers analyzed ancient DNA from medieval parchment, New Scientist says.

New Hybrid Beer Yeast

University of Washington researchers uncover a new hybrid yeast in a beer sample, according to ScienceInsider.

DNA, Skin Protector

Binghamton University researchers developed DNA-based films that can protect the skin from ultraviolet light, Harper's Bazaar reports.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: link between immune-related DNA elements and Alzheimer's, population patterns in ancient Portugal, and more.

Polygamy amplified a rare genetic disease in area near Arizona-Utah border, BBC Future reports.

Make it a Bit Fuzzy

Simple de-identification methods can protect information in a database from attackers, a new study suggests.

Unexpected Findings

Genetic ancestry testing led one woman to learn that her father and another baby boy had been switched at birth, the Washington Post reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: approach to visualize chromatin structure in nuclei, and more.

Embryos Edited in US

Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

All the Plants

Plant researchers plan to sequence some 10,000 samples that represent the major plant clades, ScienceInsider reports.

True Blue

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: a Danish reference genome, and more.

Cloud Ready

CNBC reports that Amazon invested in the startup Grail as it sees an opportunity for its cloud computing company in genomics.

The New Yeast

Researchers are working on re-making the yeast genome from scratch, according to the Associated Press.

Lawrence Krauss writes at Slate that science is needed for good public policy and should not be ignored.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: functional profiling of Plasmodium genome, a self-inactivating rabies virus, and more.

The president of France's National Research Agency has resigned, according to Nature News.

A senator wants a "right-to-try" provision in the US Food and Drug Administration funding bill, but an ethicist says at Stat News that it would undermine the role of clinical trials.

'Lifestyle Zone'

The Guardian's Barbara Ellen has tried out some DNA testing services to see whether they provide valuable information.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: red algae Porphyra umbicalis genome, deep neural network model for sequencing peptides, and more.

Helix customers can purchase apps that interpret different aspects of their genome, Technology Review reports.

The New York Times reports that a number of companies and research institutes are pursuing gene therapies.

Pages

A research duo finds that science and technology graduate students who turn away from academic careers do so because of changes in their own interests.

Students whose classmates are interested in science are more likely to think about a career in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, a new study says.

CNBC reports that the genetic counseling field is expected to grow as personalized medicine becomes more common.

Gladys Kong writes at Fortune that her STEM background has helped her as a CEO.