Close Menu

The Scan

New Privacy Coalition

Three genetic testing companies form a coalition to influence how Congress considers genetic privacy, The Hill reports.

Oh, This Code

The Wall Street Journal examines billing codes used by uBiome.

In PNAS this week: links between lung adenocarcinoma and lncRNA, algorithm to impute and cluster Hi-C interaction profiles from single cells, and more.

A new analysis finds that it will be more than a century until female computer scientists publish at the same rate as their male counterparts, ScienceInsider reports.

On to Supercomputing

New US Department of Commerce rules will affect supercomputing in China, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Broad Institute researchers describe an approach they've dubbed "DNA microscopy."

In PLOS this week: epigenetic changes following hepatitis C virus treatment, metagenomic analysis of Ugandan children with febrile illness, and more.

A 'Double Whammy'

The Guardian reports that the Mammalian Genetics Unit at the Harwell Institute is to close.

With a Little Lemon?

Restaurants in the US may soon serve AquaBounty's genetically modified salmon, according to the Associated Press.

So Much Plastic

Scientific research itself contributes to plastic waste and isn't very sustainable, FiveThirtyEight reports.

In Science this week: three studies from the Ruminant Genome Project, and more.

James Wyngaarden Dies

James Wyngaarden, the former director of the US National Institutes of Health, has died at 94, according to Duke University School of Medicine.

The Associated Press reports that a state board in Texas has asked ANDE, a maker of rapid DNA machines, to halt its work there.

Researchers find that a 30-year-old skull comes from a narwhal-beluga hybrid, according to Science News.

In Nature this week: study of value diversity in GWAS, Epstein-Barr virus subtypes linked to nasopharyngeal carcinoma risk, and more.

Why in Decline?

Researchers in Australia are sequencing the Wollemi pine tree to try to protect it from extinction, Australia's ABC News reports.

The chief executive of the National Health Service in England is to call for tumor-agnostic drugs to be "fast-tracked," according to the Times.

Computerworld ranks Illumina as one of the top midsize organizations to work at in IT.

In Genome Research this week: links between biological aging and mutations affecting epigenetic regulators; long-read sequencing-based strategy to map chromatin accessibility; and more.

By a Third

The Hill reports President Donald Trump issued an executive directing federal agencies to cut the number of board and advisory committees they have.

Push for Sequencing

Scientists in Canada are looking to the UK's plan to sequence children with rare conditions for inspiration, the National Post reports.

Faster, Faster

The New York Times reports that researchers are combining tools to more quickly develop crops to feed a growing population and cope with shifting climates.

In PNAS this week: copy number changes arose during polar bear evolution, genomic and transcriptomic analysis of the Siberian hamster, and more.

Maybe Not to Eat…

Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Moving From DC to KC

Two US Department of Agriculture research departments are moving to the Kansas City area, according to the Washington Post.

Pages

A new study finds that a positive lab environment can encourage undergraduates to continue to perform research.

A new analysis suggests non-US citizen STEM PhDs might pass up jobs at US-based startups due to visa concerns.

A UK survey of researchers who identified as LGBT+ and allies uncovered evidence of unwelcoming workplace climates in the physical sciences.

At the Guardian, the University of Edinburgh's Nikolay Ogryzko argues that universities need to better invest in postdocs' careers.