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The Scan

A blogger says we shouldn't ignore the value of haplotype data.

An article from Forbes says the genomics field needs a celebrity spokesperson.

Today's Science focuses on preparing secondary science teachers and genome-wide association studies of diabetes.

Biotech startup 23andme, which recently got a major investment from Google, ends the debate on whether Jimmy and Warren are related.

A Nodalpoint post wishes Google would intervene to give us decent metabolic maps.

GTO scans today's edition of Nature.

Jim Watson makes history as he receives a copy of his very own genome today.

The Republican senator from Kansas weighs in on evolution.

Several blog posts point to the challenges of finding freely accessible scientific literature.

A creation-based museum opens with exhibits showing, among other things, that dinosaurs lived peacefully alongside humans in the Garden of Eden.

A blog offers a how-to guide on using pieces of a scientific paper to rebuild the authors' original code when it's not available.

Ronaghi, Pevzner, and others report a method for using short reads in de novo sequencing in PLoS ONE.

Russia's government approves a national genome database to help catch criminals.

Despite company policies and pending laws, personal health and other information can still be accidentally leaked.

NYT profiles Anne Wojcicki, co-founder of biotech company 23andme, which recently got a major investment from Google.

The NIH establishes a new division to study alternative medicine -- to the chagrin of one scientist.

Genome-wide studies find additional loci associated with breast cancer.

This New York Times article describes some of the unique methods Google is using to compete for recruits with computer science or engineering backgrounds.

A blogger finds that there's rising debate about open access and genetic privacy.

An article from the Washington Post highlights the growing concerns among scientists over NIH's funding crunch.

Several of Newsweek's international editions feature Craig Venter on the cover for an article exploring synthetic biology.

Using mouse models, geneticists move toward studying networks of genes that cause disease.

GTO scans today's issue of Science.

Researchers create a holographic person, complete with the anatomy, genome data, tissue types, and chemistry of a real person.

Nature delves into epigenetics, circadian gene expression, and riboswitches.

Pages

A UK survey of researchers who identified as LGBT+ and allies uncovered evidence of unwelcoming workplace climates in the physical sciences.

At the Guardian, the University of Edinburgh's Nikolay Ogryzko argues that universities need to better invest in postdocs' careers.

Researchers who go persevere after an early funding setback end up with more highly cited papers later on, according to the Economist.

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.