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The Scan

A blogger muses on what life would be like if we could debug the human body.

Harvard loses $350 million by investing in the wrong hedge fund.

Jason Bobe suggests creating a Richter-esque scale for genome association study data.

Researchers find copy number variance for genes involved in major differences in primates and humans, including physiology.

The UK's Parliament has issued a report criticizing the newly appointed chairman of the Medical Research Council.

In the US, rules governing GMO-based food are just beginning to emerge -- giving fans hope for increased investment and opponents worried about a GMO-style backlash from the public.

Jonathan Eisen discusses a new paper that, sadly, isn't open access.

Evolutionary scientist Martin Nowak is profiled in the New York Times.

Researchers found a gene for left-handedness that also slightly increases the risk of schizophrenia.

An economic professor studies gender differences in negotiating money in the workplace.

Odile Crick, wife of Francis, died earlier this month at 86.

GTO sister pub InSequence has the names of eight other volunteers participating in the Personal Genome Project.

A postdoc from the University of Missouri is found to have altered photos in a paper that ran last year in Science.

It's official: DNA-based music has been patented. Next up: partnership with iTunes?

The Wall Street Journal profiles the 1,000-scientist-strong International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines.

This Week in Science

Science reports on drug development in China, spring-loaded DNA unwinding, gene expression noise, and more.

Blogger Rob Knop points out inconsistencies in the tenure process.

Clinical trials registries gain traction.

A blog post runs through arguments for and against peer review, noting that some fields are seeing declining review papers and growth in self-publishing online.

Diagnostics for TB haven't been improved upon in years, but this article from Wired says change is on the way.

Evolutionary biologists sequence the mitochondrial genome of the mastodon, an extinct ancestor of elephants.

This Week in Nature

Nature takes on the University of California, talks to "Roadmap czar" Alan Krensky of the NIH, and reports on childhood asthma.

A Stanford bioengineer has created a device to sequence a single bacterial cell's genome.

A blogger discusses the concept of "wrongful birth" -- a legal issue picking up steam as in utero genetic testing becomes more commonplace.

VCs are pouring record amounts of money into the life sciences industry this year, including biotech, medical devices, and healthcare.

Pages

At the Guardian, the University of Edinburgh's Nikolay Ogryzko argues that universities need to better invest in postdocs' careers.

Researchers who go persevere after an early funding setback end up with more highly cited papers later on, according to the Economist.

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.

A new analysis by Northwestern University researchers finds that female and male first-time PIs receive differing amounts of funding.