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The Scan

A blogger asks for pictures of his readers' science-related tattoos.

Drug companies stand to gain by funding biomedical research.

A blogger links to a ballad on polony sequencing. Forgive us.

Jonathan Eisen blogs on why medical professionals should get more evolution education than most medical schools currently offer.

Scientists recovered 60-million-year-old microbes from an Antarctic glacier -- and woke them up.

Score one for subscription-based publications: this blog post details an open-access trial that didn't work out.

NSF looks set to award IBM a contract to build the world's fastest supercomputer.

Fred Sanger bequeaths his collection of lab notebooks to the Wellcome Trust to make them available to the public.

Despite great funding, an embryonic stem-cell research program in California is having trouble finding a president.

Disgraced stem cell scientist didn't realize he'd made parthenogenic stem cells.

The NIH asks for ideas about peer review.

This Week in Science

Today's Science reports on immunology, patient identifiability in genomic research, synthetic biology, and more.

Creationists and engineers do virtual battle...again.

A computer program from UVA aims to predict which cancer drug is best for each patient.

A blogger says the antiquated way that authorship order is decided for publications has to go.

A new application can browse the genome in interactive real-time.

This Week in Nature

Mice, cancer, and the epigenome are all in this week's issue of Nature.

A blogger muses on what life would be like if we could debug the human body.

Harvard loses $350 million by investing in the wrong hedge fund.

Jason Bobe suggests creating a Richter-esque scale for genome association study data.

Researchers find copy number variance for genes involved in major differences in primates and humans, including physiology.

The UK's Parliament has issued a report criticizing the newly appointed chairman of the Medical Research Council.

In the US, rules governing GMO-based food are just beginning to emerge -- giving fans hope for increased investment and opponents worried about a GMO-style backlash from the public.

Jonathan Eisen discusses a new paper that, sadly, isn't open access.

Evolutionary scientist Martin Nowak is profiled in the New York Times.

Pages

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.

A new analysis by Northwestern University researchers finds that female and male first-time PIs receive differing amounts of funding.

Some 43 percent of new mothers and 23 percent of new fathers leave full-time employment in STEM in the years after having a child, Science Careers says.

STEM professors' views on intelligence affect students' success, a new study finds.