The Scan

Evolution Sticks

Settlement is reached in Georgia court case challenging the placement of anti-evo disclaimers on science textbooks.

India's New Frontier

HFSP welcomes India to its ever-expanding family.

Scanning Science

In this week's issue of Science, articles on metagenomics, proteomics, and comparative genomics.

Science's year-end edition takes a look at discredited papers -- scientific scandals that have cast doubt on the ability of peer-reviewed journals to ensure they're publishing the truth.

In an in-depth article, the WSJ reports on the price war between Affy and Illumina that's already enabling scientists to expand their research projects dramatically.

Nature ends its experiment into open peer review; papers went up for comments, but for the most part, the scientific community remained mum.

A pair of papers in today's edition of Nature find a solid correlation between the gut microbiome and the host's proclivity for obesity.

A new report from NCI joins the continuing debate: when is a biomarker really a biomarker? Plus, cool nanotech work from Chad Mirkin and others.

Parasite-induced cricket suicide: It's just plain old research until someone goes and makes a video of it.

A medical team serving in Libya has been handed the death penalty as a judge ruled that they deliberately infected children with HIV -- despite a Nature paper showing that the defendants couldn't have committed the crime.

Can't log into SciLink? A recent electrical fire knocked out the scientist networking site.

Companies say that genetic testing can be used as the basis for a personalized diet designed to protect you against your own genetic vulnerabilities. In the UK, a team is looking into these claims and wondering whether regulation is needed as nutrigenomics gears up.

Everyone gets called to task now and then to explain why taxpayer dollars are used for basic (what some would call high-risk) research. Here's a little help for your next go-round.

A four-year-old EU project comes to fruition with the planting of a ceremonial tree. Champions include Marc Vidal and John Sulston.

No big surprise here: a series of trials claim that pharmas downplayed adverse effects of popular drugs. Is this is a harbinger of lawsuits to come as people find more knowledge in genomic and proteomic data?

Svante Paabo, now at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, gets the third-degree.

A recent Cell paper has been challenged, and the corresponding author's home university recommends that the paper be retracted. How much can you trust what you read?

Cape Town Computes

Intel donates a supercomputer to the South Africa's Council for Scientific and Industrial Research.

Written protocols not your thing? Take out a subscription to the first video-based scientific journal.

High-performance chromatography gets a boost from the latest generation of monolith columns.

'Tis the season for NIH-sponsored databases, including NCI's Pathway Interaction Database and the NLM's Database of Genotype and Phenotype.

Nick Patterson made his name as a cryptologist in the Cold War -- and now spends his time trying to unravel the meaning of DNA.

Biomarker tests are catching the eye of mainstream media -- so it won't be long before consumers start asking questions. Are scientists ready with answers?

MRI scans are showing that many people with normal body weight are carrying around hidden stores of fat, which may be more about genes than snacking habits.

Pages

At Nature, a graduate student describes how to explore careers outside academia and what PhD programs can do help that search.

A new analysis of research funding finds that after receiving their first award, female researchers are just about as likely to receive additional awards as male researchers.

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.

At Nature, the University of Alberta's Devang Mehta calls on PIs to engage in conversations about racism.