The Scan

'Unnecessary Labels?'

A researcher in Australia is seeking tighter regulation of genetic testing, according to News.com.au.

NPR conducted a poll that asked people in the US about genetic testing to find that about a third have considered it.

Curiosity and Privacy

Popular Science looks into the data direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies share and how customers can opt out.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: DNA-based diagnostic for parasitic strongyloidiasis, breed-specific SNPs in Bos taurus, and more.

Stat News reports that a sponsor of the US "right-to-try" bill says in a letter that it "intends to diminish the FDA's power."

A Path to the Door

The US National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are to consider policy changes to be able to remove members who have committed sexual harassment, Science reports.

Got Big Brains

Researchers have uncovered a trio of human-specific genes that seem to govern people's large brain size, Reuters reports.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: ancient DNA gives insights into human migration to Iceland and the America, and more.

Three CRISPR researchers are to receive the Kavli Prize in nanoscience, according to the Associated Press.

Shorter Stay

The Verge reports that the US is limiting Chinese graduate students studying in certain fields to one-year visas.

A new study in Nature Communications finds a genetic correlation between cognitive function and eyesight.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: informatics approach for recovering microbial genomes from metagenomes, and more.

Go Small or Go Big?

The Wall Street Journal reports that some researchers are pinning their hopes to small, targeted clinical trials, while others argue large trials are still needed.

Researchers treated a fetus with a severe genetic disorder while still in the womb, according to the New York Times.

Promises, But Really?

NPR reports that some at-home medical tests might not be able to provide the information they say they can.

This Week in Cell

In Cell this week: interactions between malignant and immune cells in ovarian cancer, gene regulatory features in mouse macrophages, and more.

Craig Venter is retiring from Human Longevity to return to the research institution that bears his name, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

A Canadian project aims to sequence the lynx and the snowshoe hare, according to CBC News.

Peruvian researchers rely on genetic analyses to trace the origins of the Incas, AFP reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: retrotransposon expression and regulation in human cells, convergent evolution in photoreceptor proteins, and more.

Researchers have sequenced the northern white rhinoceros to gauge whether it could be brought back from the edge of extinction, the New York Times reports.

Tufts University researchers found a role for miRNA in transmitting stress between generations, the Economist reports.

Bavaria expands its forensic genetic analyses to include DNA phenotyping, raising discrimination concerns.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: gut microbiome influences liver cancer growth, spread; and more.

Make Sense of It All

The Atlantic reports that genetic counselors are coping with an influx of patients seeking advice on their direct-to-consumer genetic test results.

Pages

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.

At Nature, the University of Alberta's Devang Mehta calls on PIs to engage in conversations about racism.

A National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report calls for changing metrics to make STEM graduate school more student-centered, according to Science.

Two postdocs and a PhD hosted a panel discussion at Memorial Sloan Kettering on career advancement in science and what researchers can expect when they leave the lab.