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The Scan

What's for Lunch?

A University of Nevada-Las Vegas researcher has launched a company to recommend diets to people based on their DNA, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: microRNAs linked to brain metastasis risk in lung cancer, effects of Crohn's disease-linked mutation, and more.

Access Agreement

Family Tree DNA is providing the FBI access to its genealogy database to investigate violent crimes, according to BuzzFeed News.

Basic Editing

NPR reports on ongoing basic research involving CRISPR and human embryos in the US.

No Dumping

The Economist discusses "ethics dumping" in light of the CRISPR embryo editing announcement.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: mechanisms of trait adaptation in wild mice, and more.

Bananas, Edited

Researchers are using gene-editing tools to protect bananas from disease, New Scientist reports.

Quick, Quick

The Sydney Morning Herald reports on an Australian effort to provide quick genomic testing to ill infants.

Share Alike?

Science reports on a preprint that looks into horizontal gene transfer events between eukaryotes and prokaryotes.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: snapdragon genome assembly, genome-wide association study of circadian rhythms, and more.

The New York Times editorial board discusses the gene-editing tool CRISPR and how to move forward with genome editing.

On the Proposal

Nature News reports that scientists are among those protesting a proposal to alter the US regulation that protects against sex discrimination in education.

No, Not That Line

Retraction Watch speaks with a researcher who hopes to nudge others away from using problematic cell lines.

In Genome Research this week: collection of circular RNAs from breast cancers, chromosome-scale genome assembly for the axolotl, and more.

 The Associated Press reports that Nobel laureate Craig Mello was informed about He Jiankui's efforts to edit human embryos.

Can Also Pay for It

The National Health Service in England is to offer healthy individuals the option of paying to have their genomes analyzed, according to the Guardian.

Axolotl Assembly

A University of Kentucky-led team has generated a new axolotl genome assembly, Discover's D-brief blog reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: Fanconi anemia protein role in ribosome biogenesis, small interfering RNAs in A. thaliana seeds development, and more.

Open for a While

Though the US government is open, ScienceInsider says it'll be a while before everything is back to normal at federal research agencies.

Maryland lawmakers consider bill to prevent law enforcement from using publicly available DNA databases to identify suspects, the Daily Record reports.

The New York Times reports on new gene therapy efforts to treat sickle-cell disease.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: statistical approach for integrating eQTL and GWAS data, microRNA signature distinguishes malignant and benign salivary gland tumors, and more.

Oh, Dunno

ABC News reports on former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes' deposition to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Unexpected Kits

In a bid to amass hard-to-trace gift cards from a refer-a-friend program, hackers ordered 2,400 DNA ancestry testing kits for strangers, according to USA Today.

So the Ripples Go

The effects of the partial government shutdown in the US on science keep spreading.

Pages

Nature News reports that female scientists setting up their first labs tend to have lower salaries and smaller staffs than their male peers.

A new analysis by Northwestern University researchers finds that female and male first-time PIs receive differing amounts of funding.

Some 43 percent of new mothers and 23 percent of new fathers leave full-time employment in STEM in the years after having a child, Science Careers says.

STEM professors' views on intelligence affect students' success, a new study finds.