The Scan

Promise and Limits

Nature News looks into the limitations of patient-derived xenograft mice.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: single-cell mRNA sequencing of human renal cells, and more.

In a pair of commentaries, researchers critique last year's paper reporting the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to correct a mutation in viable human embryos.

Inside Edition reports that people are now hosting parties where they learn what breed their dogs are based on genetic testing.

Not as Much Testing

The Wall Street Journal reports that men seek genetic testing for inherited BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations much less often than women.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomic regions associated with tameness in foxes, and more.

The Salk Institute has settled two of the three gender discrimination lawsuits brought against it last year, Science reports.

Just Never

Australian groups develop guidelines that say sexual or romantic relationships between academic supervisors and their students are never acceptable.

Not Just Yet

Stat News writes that it may be too soon to give health advice based on an analysis of people's gut microbiomes.

In Genome Biology this week: coding variants linked to cardiac conduction, comparison of two dozen differential gene expression analysis pipelines, and more.

Friendly Foxes

Researchers have examined the genomes of foxes bred for tameness or aggressiveness to find a candidate gene for tameness, the Washington Post reports.

Spark Therapeutics reports new data on its investigational hemophilia A treatment that says it reduces bleeds, according to Stat News.

The Associated Press reports that the J.R. Simplot Company has acquired gene-editing licensed rights.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: targeting recurrent IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in gliomas, silkworms genetically modified to produce spider silk, and more.

It will be possible to upload genomic data to Australia's My Health Record system, which has raised privacy issues, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

For a Broader Group

Scientific American reports that drugs being pursued to treat small fraction of Parkinson's disease patients with a certain gene mutation could also help a larger portion of patients.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: mutation linked to progressive ataxia in Charolais cattle, microRNA expression levels linked to colorectal cancer, and more.

Summer Genomics

A program at Simon Fraser University hopes to expose Indigenous students to genomics, according to the Vancouver Sun.

Support and Trust

My Gene Counsel's Ellen Matloff says Facebook needs to regain the trust of patient groups that used its closed groups for support.

Beginning With Two

A pair of researchers has been studying how rules that govern the translation of DNA into proteins evolved.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic study of Homo floresiensis, approach for counting immune cells based on DNA signatures, and more.

In These Cases, Sure

A new poll found that US adults consider editing fetal genes acceptable if it's to improve the child's health, Newsweek reports.

And That's It

Business Insider reports that a three-year partnership between Ancestry and Calico has ended.

Talent Flow

An opinion piece in the Boston Globe says the US is losing scientific talent to China.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to generate yeast with minimal chromosomes, atrial fibrillation risk variants, and more.

Pages

A new analysis finds that better grant-writing skills may help early-career researchers stay funded and stay in academia.

At Nature, a graduate student describes how to explore careers outside academia and what PhD programs can do help that search.

A new analysis of research funding finds that after receiving their first award, female researchers are just about as likely to receive additional awards as male researchers.

The Nature Jobs blog reports that the University of Chicago is no longer requiring graduate school applicants to submit standardized test scores.