The Scan

Researchers have uncovered antibiotic-resistant strains of Enterobacter on the International Space Station, according to Discover's D-brief blog.

A new analysis finds increased transparency regarding conflicts of interest and funding in recent biomedical journal articles, Nature News reports.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: study of human-Neanderthal interbreeding, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder risk loci reported, and more.

He Jiankui announced another pregnancy resulting from his gene-editing work in his presentation to the International Human Genome Editing Summit, Stat News reports.

Researchers in Argentina are to analyze the genomes of about 80,000 polo horses, according to AFP.

NPR speaks with US researchers about working in China.

In Genome Biology this week: study of selection in orangutan populations, eQTLs in developing human brain, and more.

China has ordered an investigation into claims that CRISPR was used to genetically modify two human infants, the Guardian reports.

The US Food and Drug Administration is developing a new approach for clearing medical devices to take technological advances and modern safety and performance requirements into account.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: germline variants influence tumor immune gene expression in two dozen cancer types, phylogenetic relationships of hemipteroid insects, and more.

Southern University of Science and Technology's He Jiankui has announced the birth of twin girls who underwent CRISPR-based editing of their CCR5 genes.

Duty to Tell?

A UK woman sues a hospital for not telling her of her father's genetic testing results, the Guardian reports.

And Settled

Science reports that the Salk Institute has settled the third of its three gender discrimination lawsuits.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: sequencing of Chardonnay clones, high-density peach tree genetic map, and more.

The New York Times Magazine writes that proteomics might be better poised than genomics to say when someone is falling ill.

"Must Stop"

In an editorial, Nature calls for the end to the exploitation of foreign postdocs.

Lab Space and a Dream

Bloomberg profiles IndieBio, a startup incubator for the life sciences.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: collection of epigenome-wide association study data, updated BloodSpot database, and more.

A settlement is expected in a Duke University lawsuit hinging on using falsified data to win grants, Retraction Watch and Science report.

A new study finds that a placental protein linked with preeclampsia can be targeted by RNA silencing, according to the New Scientist.

Something Different

A phylogenetic analysis finds that the rare hemimastigotes form their own supra-kingdom, CBC reports.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: approach for analyzing the expression of endogenous retroviruses, circular RNAs that influence host-virus interactions, and more.

Free-Ish

Nebula Genomics is launching its genome sequencing service for free for people who provide certain information about themselves, the Boston Globe reports.

Shaken Identity

Genetic ancestry testing can affect a person's sense of identity, the New York Times Magazine writes.

Isolation Worries

An opinion piece at Bloomberg discusses China's stance on genomic research.

Pages

Researchers find that younger investigators fare better when seeking support through crowdfunding sites, Nature News reports.

Nature News reports that doing a postdoc might not help researchers find employment.

Pennsylvania State University's Kathleen Grogan says researchers need to approach data on gender and racial diversity in the sciences like they would any other dataset.

The National Science Foundation is adding questions about sexual orientation and gender identity to its Survey of Earned Doctorates, according to Science Careers.