The Scan

In Genome Research this week: guide RNAs to target KRAS mutations, modeling organ development from single cells, and more.

Arno Motulsky Dies

Arno Motulsky, a founder of both medical genetics and pharmacogenomics, has died, the New York Times reports.

A new report from the Personalized Medicine Coalition highlights new personalized medicines approvals by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Some Guarded Hope

The Deseret News reports that families with children with rare genetic diseases are cautiously optimistic about CRISPR-based gene editing as a treatment.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: DNA damage associated with e-cigarette exposure, inflammasome inhibition by OLT1177, and more.

Look at the Science

Female grant applicants do about as well as their male colleagues when the review focuses on the science proposed, according to Nature News.

Such Long Sequences

Researchers have used a portable nanopore sequencer to sequence and assemble a human reference genome.

The Earth BioGenome Project is joining forces with the Earth Bank of Codes, according to the Economist.

Will They Renew?

As the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine runs out of funds, NPR asks whether states will again fund stem cell research.

This Week in PLOS

In PLOS this week: metabolite profiles of typhoid fever, shifts in cell-free DNA levels following exercise, and more.

University of Washington researchers are collecting pictures from people to encode in DNA to explore its use as data storage device, Wired reports.

Better Cows

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation gives funds toward livestock research, BBC News reports.

For Some or All?

Noah Smith writes at Bloomberg that gene editing brings up issues of economic fairness.

This Week in Science

In Science this week: genetic nurture influences educational attainment, and more.

Chinese researchers have used somatic cell nuclear transfer to clone two monkeys, called Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua.

And Azar Confirmed

The US Senate has confirmed Alex Azar as secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services, according to NPR.

This Week in Nature

In Nature this week: genomes of two organisms that regenerate body parts, sea lamprey genome, and more.

A Kyoto University investigation finds a researcher guilty of manipulating image data in a stem cell paper, Retraction Watch reports.

Hope for Funds

A possible coalition government in Germany could mean increased science funding, Nature News reports.

Blue-Eyed Doggos

Researchers used data from dogs that underwent direct-to-consumer genetic testing to find variants linked to blue eyes, Slate reports.

In Genome Biology this week: gene expression patterns in mice with obesity-linked gut microbiomes, epigenetics of identical twins, and more.

With fewer rules, doctors in China are moving ahead with CRISPR clinical trials, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Stat News reports that researchers are not good at predicting whether a clinical trial will be successful.

"Just a Piece"

An NPR reporter finds that ancestry results from genetic testing don't always reflect family history.

This Week in PNAS

In PNAS this week: method to predict cancer susceptibility, root microbiome, and more.


NIH's Michael Lauer looks at the number of grants, their amount, and funding success rates at the agency for last year.

At Nature, Johns Hopkins' Gundula Bosch describes her graduate program that aims to get doctoral students thinking about the big picture.

Patricia Fara writes about childcare funding, and women in science and science history at NPR.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences researchers have visualized the career paths of former postdocs.