The Scan

Omics! Omics! blogs a short history of bioinformatic programming languages.

Research suggests that the formation of the first complex life systems followed Darwinian evolutionary principles.

Scientists say woolly mammoths were succumbing to genetic challenges all their own before humans came along.

Microsoft announced the latest in a series of deals granting "amnesty" to companies that otherwise might have been sued for using the IP-challenged Linux platform.

This Week in Science

Today's Science focuses on ChIPSeq, PMAGE, and whole genome association studies.

A blog post from the Wired team says Craig Venter is competing with the HGP group again. Surprise.

Scientists find genetic markers linking suicidal thinking to antidepressants.

Wire stories report on the status of two bills in US Congress -- one on cloning, and one on federal funding of stem cell research.

This Week in Nature

Nature has a genome-wide bonanza, but also has medaka and stem cells

Sponges and Synapses?

Scientists find clues to the evolution of the human nervous system.

Open source or open notebook?

Two science policy analysts advocate including community participation in research.

A collaborative effort in London starts the search for a cure for AMD.

A humorous blog post presents the top 10 ways DNA technology will change your life.

A Gates Foundation grant will establish a new institute to track the impact of public health programs around the world.

Blogger Thomas Goetz has a funny sense of déjà vu about personalized medicine.

The press continues to digest Watson's genome sequence; these articles describe the potential of sequencing on a grand scale.

Mayo Clinic researchers use supercomputers to model infectious disease.

A blogger says we shouldn't ignore the value of haplotype data.

An article from Forbes says the genomics field needs a celebrity spokesperson.

This Week in Science

Today's Science focuses on preparing secondary science teachers and genome-wide association studies of diabetes.

Biotech startup 23andme, which recently got a major investment from Google, ends the debate on whether Jimmy and Warren are related.

A Nodalpoint post wishes Google would intervene to give us decent metabolic maps.

This Week in Nature

GTO scans today's edition of Nature.

Jim Watson makes history as he receives a copy of his very own genome today.


NIH's Michael Lauer looks at the number of grants, their amount, and funding success rates at the agency for last year.

At Nature, Johns Hopkins' Gundula Bosch describes her graduate program that aims to get doctoral students thinking about the big picture.

Patricia Fara writes about childcare funding, and women in science and science history at NPR.

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences researchers have visualized the career paths of former postdocs.